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Farm and Family

  • Warm winter could affect tall fescue toxicosis

    This warm winter has been nice because of 50 degree weather and not having to feed as much hay.
    However, this warm winter has played havoc for many farmers, such as increased mud and lately I have heard from Dr. Ray Smith from the University of Kentucky that this mild winter is likely to cause higher than average concentration of ergovaline in tall fescue.
    Tall fescue is still widely planted throughout Kentucky because of its yield potential and ruggedness, but tall fescue is naturally infected with an endophytic fungus that produces ergovaline.

  • Drink up: Get enough water to promote health and wellness

    Most of us hear early on that we should drink water for good health, but some of us may not know why it is so important.
    More than two-thirds of our bodies are made of water. It helps lubricate our joints, and without water our organs could not properly function.
    Water is also essential in helping us remove waste from our bodies.
    If you don’t consume enough water, you run the risk of becoming dehydrated.
    Dehydration can cause headaches, mood changes, fever, dizziness, rapid heartbeat and kidney problems among others.

  • USDA’s latest numbers on Ky. cattle

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) recently released the cattle report, showing little change in beef cow numbers, but a continued decline in milk cows in Kentucky.
    “This report shows cattle production remains a vital part of the Commonwealth’s agricultural economy,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “In 2015, gross receipts from cattle were $927 million, the second leading commodity behind broiler production.

  • Are you getting the most reliable ag information?

    In today’s society, with increased internet access and social media presence, it is easy to become lost trying to research a specific topic or solution to a problem.
    If I check my social media accounts or emails, there is always that post or flyer wanting you to try this new and improved product or do this a specific way. From the post or email, you might think, “I have to try this!”
    I’m not only talking about posts about kitchen appliances or recipes, but I’m am referring to agricultural posts on social media and online.

  • Deadline to enter in the 4-H Communications Program is Feb. 27

    Henry County 4-H will hold its annual Communications Program on March 28, 6 p.m., at the Extension Office.
    Many past 4-H members state that public speaking is a skill learned in 4-H that had the greatest impact on their career success.
    The communications program allows youth the opportunity to explore and develop abilities in public speaking, personal expression and interaction with others. Youth have the chance to participate in speeches, demonstrations and the variety show. Youth can participate in more than one event.

  • Don’t overlook the Earned Income, Child tax credits

    Millions of workers could overlook important federal tax benefits because they simply don’t know about them.  
    The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit can make a real difference for workers who are struggling to make ends meet.  
    The Earned Income Tax Credit is a refundable tax credit available to qualifying lower-wage workers and their families.
    Workers earning less than about $50,000 from wages, self-employment or farming in 2016 could qualify.

  • Get your pastures ready to reduce grass tetany

    One thing about farming is that you always have to look towards the future, and one thing to look forward to is spring pastures.
    In early spring, cool season grasses start growing at a rapid rate. When this happens, magnesium may not be as available to your livestock, and when magnesium is low, your livestock can encounter grass tetany.
    Grass tetany is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced magnesium (Mg) levels in the animal’s blood.

  • Protect yourself from the No. 1 cause of women’s illness and death

    Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of illness and death for women and kills more than all forms of cancer combined. February is Women’s Heart Health Month, and it is a great time for women to start taking better care of their hearts all year round.
    It’s important to know your personal risk for heart disease and family history.
    Common risk factors for heart disease include elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, diabetes, a sedentary lifestyle and being overweight or obese.  

  • Local producer found an organic way to control the weeds

    Goats turned out to be the brush control for David Neville that helped him to certify Capstone Farms as organic, according to a news release from the Energy and Environment Cabinet, Division of Compliance Assistance.

  • More details about the upcoming youth beef contest

    The Henry County Extension Office is offering a new contest this year — the 2017 Henry County Youth Best Beef Contest.
    This contest’s purpose is to educate youth about finishing beef animals and determining potential marketing opportunities for their beef while competing for the best beef animal and best speech.
    Participants in this contest will raise a beef animal to market weight, have that animal processed, attend a three-week educational series, and give two speeches on how the animal was raised and how that processed animal will be marketed.