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Farm and Family

  • It’s no bull: Get a breeding soundness exam

    I hope everyone is having an excellent calving season, and I’m sure you are worn out from checking your mothers-to-be.
    I know many of you are focused on your calves, but remember what comes after calving season: spring breeding season.
    Every year, I will hear stories about how a majority of someone’s cows will come up open during pregnancy checks, and I will hear excuses such as “I think this poor quality hay caused my cows to be open,” or “this mineral was the problem.”

  • Ag Tag makes a difference for Henry County youth in 4-H and FFA programs

    Kentucky 4-H is one of the most important and influential youth programs in our state and our county.
    Across Kentucky over 279,000 youth ages 9 to 19 learn about leadership, citizenship and life skills in “learn-by-doing” experiences such as communications and public speaking, through agriculture projects like livestock, shooting sports, 4-H camp, Teen Conference, and many other 4-H programs and activities.

  • Take care: Whooping cough has struck in Kentucky

    You may have heard about the cases of whooping cough in Lexington.   
    Although most persons you may meet are vaccinated against the illness, it is important to be aware of whooping cough, its symptoms and treatment.
    Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory illness.  It is very contagious.

  • Outbreak of dangerous avian flu found in Tenn.

    These are the types of articles I hate writing because the end point is never pleasant.
    The H7 strain of high pathogenic avian influenza was found in a flock of 73,500 chickens in Tennessee along the Alabama border.
    Many might think, “Well, that is pretty far from Kentucky, so why should I worry?”
    You should worry because this is a similar strain that killed around 50 million chickens and turkeys two years ago. This strain is easily transmitted, and wild migrating waterfowl can carry this disease.

  • Emergency education: Things to know before dialing 911 for help

    We all know to call 911 to report life-threatening emergencies, but knowing what to say to a dispatcher can help increase police, fire or EMT response time, which in some situations can save a life.
    When calling 911, try to stay calm and answer questions to the best of your ability. Answer loudly and answer clearly.
    Dispatchers are trained to ask certain questions to help them best assess a situation.
    Be sure to describe your location to the best of your ability with either a street address, intersection or landmarks to help emergency personnel locate you.

  • Safely reintroducing horses to spring pastures

    Spring is almost here, and guess what? That means cool season grasses are starting to explode with growth.
    The spring growth provides excellent forages for horses, but the quick change in diet can cause issues in your horses.
    Horses that have been fed hay all winter have adapted their gut microbes to break down more fibrous material, and the lush pastures are low in fiber compared with cured hay.

  • Small Engine Club revs up

    Henry County 4-H is excited to offer a Small Engine Club this spring.  Since this club is a progressive hands-on learning experience, we would like for all participants to sign up for the three consecutive meetings that will take place on March 16, 23 and 30 after school from 3:30 till 5 p.m.  
    The group will be meeting at the Henry County Maintenance Garage that is located at Harry Hill Park between the baseball fields and the soccer fields.

  • Spring cleaning can include straightening up old financial records

    Many people have an annual spring cleaning routine that includes washing windows, cabinets and woodwork.  This year, take time to also “clean-up” your financial records. Sort through your financial paperwork and identify old statements that can be shredded or thrown away.
    Remember, it is always a good idea to shred any paperwork that contains personal information, especially bank account, credit card or other financial information.  

  • By composting, make your own fertilizer at home

    Are you trying to figure out what to do with those fallen leaves, grass clippings and other yard waste? Don’t throw this in the trash.
    Try home composting. Home composting is an easy way of recycling nutrients back into your soil.
    The results of home composting is a high quality compost/fertilizer that can easily be applied to your soil.
    Before starting home composting, you need to understand what composting is.

  • USDA’s latest numbers on Ky. cattle

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) recently released the cattle report, showing little change in beef cow numbers, but a continued decline in milk cows in Kentucky.
    “This report shows cattle production remains a vital part of the Commonwealth’s agricultural economy,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “In 2015, gross receipts from cattle were $927 million, the second leading commodity behind broiler production.