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Agriculture

  • Rose rosette disease targets Knockout Roses

    Having a rose which is resistant to many of the problems of the old roses has made Knockout Roses very popular around Henry County.  However, a new disease called Rose Rosette has appeared in the landscape, and it can certainly take out the Knockout.

  • CAIP applications are due Friday at 4 p.m.

  • Dealing with Type 2 diabetes is tough, especially for teens

    Dealing with Type 2 diabetes can be difficult at any age, but it can be especially troubling for teenagers, who must also deal with the pressures of youth including self-image and self-worth. As a parent, you can do simple things to make managing this disease easier for your teen and your entire family.
    Obesity is one of the leading causes of Type 2 diabetes. Helping overweight teenagers with diabetes reach and maintain a healthy weight may help them feel physically and mentally better and may improve their glucose, or blood sugar, levels.

  • Poison hemlock a problem for livestock

    As you travel around Henry County and most of the state, you probably notice the tall white flowered plants beside the roadways, along the fences, and out into some fields.  The plant is Poison Hemlock, and it looks as if it is rapidly becoming the new Nodding Head Thistle as a problem for farmers. 

  • Henry County Homemakers celebrate 74 years

    The Henry County Extension Homemakers celebrated their 74th annual meeting this past week at the Extension Office.   The meeting opened with a silent auction to raise funds for the Kentucky Extension Homemaker Ovarian Cancer program and a collection of personal care items that was donated to the Family Resource Center.

  • Sharpshooters shine at youth challenge

    The Kentucky Hunter Youth Challenge was held May 25-27 at Jabez.  The event entails eight areas including: shotgun, rifle, black powder, rifle, orienteering, animal identification, safety trail and the written test.  Participants of the challenge compete in teams and individually. The two-day competition is sponsored by the NRA for youth organizations to encourage safe hunting practices.  The teams are broken into age groups with junior teams made up of youth ages 9 to 15 and senior groups consisting of ages 15 to 19. 

  • Be prepared: Expect the unexpected

    Many people purchase insurance, such as home, auto, or life, to protect them financially if an unexpected event occurs. It is important to review your policies on an annual basis to ensure they still meet your current needs. The recent spring storms in Kentucky serve as a reminder of the importance of updating and understanding your insurance policies. The best time to plan is always before a disaster or crisis occurs.

  • KADF cost share applications are available; due June 15

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund is now taking applications for Henry County Phase I Cost-Share Funds. Applications are available at the Henry County Extension Office at 2151 Campbellsburg Road, New Castle, and must be submitted to the same location by 4 p.m. Friday, June 15. This will be the only application period for KADF funds in 2012.

  • Rowlett reelected to DFA Board

    Terry Rowlett, a dairy farmer from Campbellsburg, has been re-elected to serve on Dairy Farmers of America, Inc.’s Board of Directors, representing the cooperative’s Mideast Area. He will serve a two-year term.

    In a family partnership with his wife and sister, Rowlett milks 120 cows and raises corn silage, grain, tobacco and grass hay on more than 600 acres.

  • Hone up now on your summertime first aid

    In Kentucky, we usually spend more time outdoors during the summer months and we may need some First Aid Treatment for the following conditions.

    Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke

    Excessive exercise, heavy sweating and not drinking enough water in hot weather can lead to heat exhaustion. You may have a headache, feel faint, nauseated, and dizzy and/or develop a fever. You may also have cool, clammy skin and look pale. Untreated heat exhaustion can become heatstroke, which is a medical emergency and can be life threatening.