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Farm and Family

  • Several Extension events will bloom this spring

    Some upcoming spring Extension events include:

    March 30 — Truth and Consequences   
    This is a new 4-H and school program designed to help freshmen students from both Henry County and Eminence understand the consequences of using drugs or alcohol.  
    We need about 50 to 60 volunteers and are short 10 to 15.  
    As a volunteer you will act as a parent or guardia guiding a student through each booth and helping them understand the consequences of actions related to drug and alcohol abuse.  

  • It’s no bull: Get a breeding soundness exam

    I hope everyone is having an excellent calving season, and I’m sure you are worn out from checking your mothers-to-be.
    I know many of you are focused on your calves, but remember what comes after calving season: spring breeding season.
    Every year, I will hear stories about how a majority of someone’s cows will come up open during pregnancy checks, and I will hear excuses such as “I think this poor quality hay caused my cows to be open,” or “this mineral was the problem.”

  • Be aware of the signs of colorectal cancer

    March is colorectal cancer awareness month. Cancers of the colon and/or rectum have long been associated with individuals over 50.
    While that age group still accounts for the majority of cases, they are declining thanks to increased disease awareness and preventative screenings.
    But diagnoses among adults in their 20s and 30s are on the rise, according to a recent study conducted by researchers with the American Cancer Society.

  • Club to incubate some poultry scientists

    Did you know it takes 21 days for chicken eggs to develop while it takes 28 days for duck eggs?
    The Rabbit and Poultry Club will learn poultry science at their next meeting on Monday, March 27. They will be focusing on the development of the chick while in an egg.
    Eggs will be obtained from the University of Kentucky and incubated for several weeks. Some eggs will be placed immediately in an incubator while others will be stored for a week to 10 days.

  • Sewing projects

    Andi Underwood, Izzy Hunt and Isabelle Ryan recently completed these projects in 4-H Sewing Club, according to facilitators.

  • Outbreak of dangerous avian flu found in Tenn.

    These are the types of articles I hate writing because the end point is never pleasant.
    The H7 strain of high pathogenic avian influenza was found in a flock of 73,500 chickens in Tennessee along the Alabama border.
    Many might think, “Well, that is pretty far from Kentucky, so why should I worry?”
    You should worry because this is a similar strain that killed around 50 million chickens and turkeys two years ago. This strain is easily transmitted, and wild migrating waterfowl can carry this disease.

  • Take care: Whooping cough has struck in Kentucky

    You may have heard about the cases of whooping cough in Lexington.   
    Although most persons you may meet are vaccinated against the illness, it is important to be aware of whooping cough, its symptoms and treatment.
    Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory illness.  It is very contagious.

  • Ag Tag makes a difference for Henry County youth in 4-H and FFA programs

    Kentucky 4-H is one of the most important and influential youth programs in our state and our county.
    Across Kentucky over 279,000 youth ages 9 to 19 learn about leadership, citizenship and life skills in “learn-by-doing” experiences such as communications and public speaking, through agriculture projects like livestock, shooting sports, 4-H camp, Teen Conference, and many other 4-H programs and activities.

  • Safely reintroducing horses to spring pastures

    Spring is almost here, and guess what? That means cool season grasses are starting to explode with growth.
    The spring growth provides excellent forages for horses, but the quick change in diet can cause issues in your horses.
    Horses that have been fed hay all winter have adapted their gut microbes to break down more fibrous material, and the lush pastures are low in fiber compared with cured hay.

  • Emergency education: Things to know before dialing 911 for help

    We all know to call 911 to report life-threatening emergencies, but knowing what to say to a dispatcher can help increase police, fire or EMT response time, which in some situations can save a life.
    When calling 911, try to stay calm and answer questions to the best of your ability. Answer loudly and answer clearly.
    Dispatchers are trained to ask certain questions to help them best assess a situation.
    Be sure to describe your location to the best of your ability with either a street address, intersection or landmarks to help emergency personnel locate you.