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Agriculture

  • Teens Place Top in 4-H State Livestock Judging
  • Water most important nutrient in summer

    Sometimes we discuss animal nutrition and almost forget the most important nutrient – water.

    No matter what animal and what we are feeding, nothing works correctly unless the animals have access to clean water. Reduction in weight gain, milk production, and animal performance are consequences of lack of an adequate water source.

  • Extension celebrates 100 years of food preservation

    For the past 100 years, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has improved the lives of families through educational programs in food preservation.

    Beginning in the spring of 1914, girls’ canning clubs were formed at the height of the canning season to teach young people how to safely preserve their harvests.

    In the 1940s amidst the back drop of World War II, agricultural and home demonstration agents encouraged Kentuckians to produce 75 percent of their food at home through a “live-at-home” campaign.

  • Lawsuit victory for Kentucky farmers

     Last week, I wrote about the delay in the administration of the 2014 programs such as the  CAIP cost share programs which rely on Kentucky Ag Development Funds.  These funds have been available to Henry County farmers since 2001, and used to be known as the Phase I funds of the Master Settlement Agreement.  The delay was caused because some of the Tobacco Settlement Funds had not been received yet by the state.  

  • Many fun summertime activities on the way

     

    County Fair

    Enter your exhibits on Monday, June 30 from 9 a.m. until noon at the Henry County Fairgrounds!  

  • Master Clothing Volunteer recruitment deadline soon

    Thanks to shows like “Project Runway,” sewing is enjoying newfound popularity. More and more people are interested in learning how to design and make their own unique style of clothing, but have little resources to do so. Individuals with basic knowledge of garment construction, who want to perfect their craft and help others learn to sew, may find participating in the Master Clothing Volunteer program very enjoyable and fulfilling. Recruitment for the Master Clothing Volunteer Class of 2014 is ongoing through the end of June.

  • Upcoming activities throughout the county

    Cattlemen’s Association to meet

    The Henry County Cattleman’s Association will meet Monday, June 23, at 7:00 pm, at the Henry County Extension Office. Featured speaker will be Dr. Gregg Rentfrow, Muscle Meats Specialist at the UK College of Agriculture. Dr. Rentfrow will be demonstrating butcher techniques for breaking down large primal parts of a beef carcass. Also on the program will be the usual brief business meeting and the Veterinarians, FSA, FFA, and Phase I reports.

  • Yount to attend state agricultural leaders program

    Henry County’s Justin Yount will join 45 other students from across Kentucky at the Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders at Murray State University June 15-19.

    Summer vacation may be only beginning for most students, but for ninety-two high school juniors the emphasis on education continues.

    These students, from 60 counties across the state, have accepted invitations to attend Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 29th annual Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders (IFAL), held in two locations this month, according to the organizers.

  • Cold can cause injuries to trees and shrubs

    Dr. Bill Fountain, UK Extension Horticulturist, has recently written a fairly complete summary of the winter of 2013-14 and how it has affected our landscape trees and shrubs.

    I’ve taken the liberty of shortening the article. If you’d like to have a copy of the entire piece, please contact me at the Henry County Extension Office (845-2811).

    There are some unusual circumstances regarding the weather and our plant material this winter. The plant hardiness zone for most of Kentucky is zone 6.

  • Extreme heat’s effect on older adults

    Summer is upon us, and temperatures are beginning to heat up.

    While that may be welcome news for many, combinations of high humidity and excessive heat can be dangerous for others, especially older adults.

    When a person’s body cannot properly cool itself, it increases the risks for heat-related illnesses.

    Older adults are more susceptible to hyperthermia, a common heat-related illness that results in a dangerously high body temperature.

    The most common form of hyperthermia is heatstroke.