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Agriculture

  • 4-H members take a walk in the woods

    By Cathy Toole

    Henry County Extension Service

  • Teen Conference held at the University of Kentucky

    By Cathy Toole, Cooperative Extension Service

  • Problems related to health and wealth go hand-in-hand

    Research has shown that there are similarities between the issues that we have with both our health and our wealth. For example problems with both start small and become accepted and carry fewer stigmas than before.

    Think about it our weight problems usually develop gradually, such as gaining three to four pounds a year. In the same way our outstanding credit card balances are also on the rise due to increased consumer spending and higher interest and/or fees on cards.

  • The spring and summer of plant diseases

    By Levi Berg, Cooperative Extension Service

    Is your garden struggling? Are your fruit trees struggling? If they aren’t, you might be one of the lucky few in the state of Kentucky.

    This year’s weather has played havoc on vegetables and fruit crops.

    The wet, cool spring and wet, hot summer has become the perfect conditions for plant diseases.

    The Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic lab has been processing numerous samples, and released a report of the most viewed disease this year.

  • Tips for parenting the second time around

    Many of us have fond memories of our grandfathers — the stories, the candy, the fishing lessons and life lessons we learned while visiting them. These are things we treasure and carry with us throughout our lives.

    But as family dynamics have changed, more and more grandfathers are finding the old adage of “spoil them rotten and send them home” no longer a reality.

    In fact, around 2.4 million grandparents across the United States are now raising their grandchildren.

  • Stay healthy by washing up after working on the farm

    Levi Berg, Cooperative Extension 

    Most times when we hear about safe handling of livestock, we think about the safety of the animals. However, many times we don’t think about our own safety in regards to diseases, bacteria and so on.

    Livestock, such as poultry, horses, ruminants and others, have digestive systems that can convert forages into usable nutrients, and this is possible because of bacteria, fungi and protozoa living in the intestinal tracts of those animals.

  • Forestry day allows 4-H to dig deep in the woods

    Cathy Toole, Henry County Cooperative Extension

    On Wednesday, June 8, 4-H youth had the opportunity to learn about the environment during the first day of the Forestry Days program.

    Twenty-one had the opportunity to travel to Henry County Park on Campbellsburg Road to listen to an expert, Lynn Garrison, retired employee from Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, speak about trees and to collect leaves for a 4-H project.

  • Getting ready for the state fair

    JESSE HARP/Local

  • Use sunscreen: Kids need protection from UV rays, too

    It’s often said that the habits children learn at a young age carry over to adulthood. Safe sun exposure should be included in those healthy habits.

  • The idea of using a rain barrel is not all wet

    I know rain has been a problem this year from mowing lawns, making hay, planting gardens, transplanting tobacco and planting row crops.

    However, what if you could put that rain to work?

    One way individuals can use rainwater is by collecting it in rain barrels and using the collected rain water when rain becomes scarce in the summer months.

    Rain barrels offer a number of benefits such as helping reduce stormwater runoff and potentially protecting homes’, barns’ and other structures’ foundations.