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Agriculture

  • Students plan windowsill gardens

    Fourth and fifth graders across the county planted windowsill gardens this month during 4-H school clubs.

    Each class begins by completing a seed identification activity that requires them to draw a picture of the seed and list them by name and variety.

    The seeds that were used for the garden include: pumpkin, green bean, corn, cilantro, zinnia and tomato.

    Students received a sectioned tray with each of the seed names already labeled and filled with moistened peat pellets. 

  • Poor is a matter of perspective

    Long ago, in a land far away, a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the rural countryside with the purpose of motivating his son to work hard by showing him how poor people can be. They spent a couple of days and nights helping with the daily activities of a poor family.  Sharing meals at night with the family, they learned a little about the rhythm of life on the farm.

    On their return home from the trip, the father asked the son, “How was the trip?”

    “It was great, Dad.”

  • Host families needed for exchange program

    This summer, 15 young people from Japan and an adult chaperone will come to Kentucky to learn about American families and culture. A great way for you and your child to take part in this international experience is by becoming a host family for one of these students.

    Not only do 4-H host families get to enjoy helping the Japanese 4-H’er learn about American families and culture, but they also learn about Japanese culture, customs and history. Many times, lifetime bonds are created.

  • Tips for spring calvers

    • Continue to feed cows that have calved on an adequate nutritional plan to rebreed. Increase their feed after calving. Don’t let them lose body condition.  
    • Purchase replacement bulls at least 30 days prior to the start of the breeding season.  Have herd bulls evaluated for breeding soundness (10-20 percent of bulls are questionable or unsatisfactory breeders).  
    • Start breeding heifers one heat cycle before cows so that they have extra time to recover from calving next year.  

  • Diabetes Education Day is Saturday

    Plan now to attend the Diabetes Education Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, April 21, at the Warrior Activity Center located at 297 West Broadway in Eminence. You can attend sessions all day or part of the day!  And you will come away discovering self-management tips to decrease the complications of diabetes.

  • Start planning your estate today

    Have you ever asked yourself the “what if” questions? What if something should happen to me today? What if something should happen to my spouse or business partner? What if I have an accident that leaves me incapacitated?

    No one likes to think about these questions. But the answers are very important to your surviving family members. Taking the time to answer those questions can provide peace of mind. It also can mean that your wishes for asset distribution following death will be followed.

  • Beef finishing workshop set for May 1

    The Cooperative Extension Service is finalizing plans to hold a forage based beef finishing workshop at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 1, at the Shelby County Extension Office.  The information packed session will include lunch. Please hold the entire day for the session.

    With more and more emphasis on locally grown food in our region, it fits that locally finished beef demand will increase.  This workshop focuses on type and breeds of beef, forage quality and animal nutrition, age of animal, taste, marketing strategies, and many other factors.

  • 4-H Communications Event & Variety Show

    The annual 4-H Communications Event and Variety Show was held on Tuesday, March 20.

  • Forages reaching critical maturity ages

    After an extremely warm winter, many forage grasses and small grains used for forages are quickly nearing the stages where they need to be cut to maintain optimum feed quality, according to Ray Smith, extension forage specialist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Depending on the area of the state, the forages are two to three weeks ahead of schedule.

  • USDA announces CRP signup

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture will conduct a four-week Conservation Reserve Program general signup, which begins March 12 and ends April 6.

    CRP is a voluntary program available to agricultural producers to help them use environmentally sensitive land for conservation benefits. In return, USDA provides participants with rental payments and cost-share assistance.