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Agriculture

  • 4-H Issues Conference coming up in November

    The annual 4-H Issues Conference is a four-day gathering of top student leaders from across the Commonwealth. The conference is held annually during the fall. It is open to high school sophomores and juniors who display leadership potential and who will make a commitment to implement what they learn back home.

  • See 'The Last Shaker' Oct. 25

    The Chautauqua performance of “The Last Shaker” will take place at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 25, at Twin Oaks.

    Frank and Mary Settles were planning to move from Louisville to Missouri, where they would purchase a farm and raise a family. But when Frank left Mary and the children at Pleasant hill to get the farm, he never returned.  She taught at Pleasant Hill for 27 years and was the last member to live there.  Janet Scott will portray Mary Settles.  Scott is the co-founder of Lexington’s highly-acclaimed theatre group On the Verge. 

  • Make money by growing food

    The Louisville Farm to Table effort will present a full day of exploration into  the world beyond farmers’ markets, Making Money Growing Food, this Thursday, Oct. 20, at St. Catharine Mother House near Springfield.

    The program begins at 8:30 a.m., and will include many discussions of opportunities to ramp up your food growing farming operation.  Topics will include:  large volume buyers, beef and beyond, specialty products, public school food service, the wine market, MarketReady, “They Want What?” and others.  

  • Conference is a chance for women to grow

    Kentucky farm women can get together to compare notes, listen to nationally prominent speakers, and enjoy a delicious Kentucky Proud meal at the 12th annual Kentucky Women in Agriculture Conference Oct. 26-28 at the Crowne Plaza-Campbell House in Lexington.

  • Field Day is Oct. 13 at MacLean Tree Farm

    The Angus MacLean Tree Farm in Oldham County will be the site of this year’s Tree Farmer of the Year Field Day. The farm has been under active woodland management for more than 50 years, and the MacLean family has managed it to promote high-quality timber and wildlife habitat.

  • Oct. 9 is annual statewide 2nd Sunday

    Mark your calendar today—the next statewide 2nd Sunday is Oct. 9. 2nd Sunday is designed to get individuals, families and children moving and engaged in activity—whether they bike, walk, run, play or participate in fun and healthy activities.

    The idea for Kentucky’s focus on movement was inspired by a similar, popular event in Bogota, Columbia, where officials close more than 70 miles of roads to vehicles, opening them to local residents for exercise every Sunday.

  • Regional beef field day is set for Oct. 4

    The Henry County Extension Service and the Henry County Cattleman’s Association would like to invite you to the Regional Beef Field Day on Tuesday, Oct. 4, at Taylor Cattle Farm at 7980 Hanna Road in Shelby County. 

    Registration will begin at 4 p.m., with farm tours starting about 5 p.m. 

    Topics and presentations will include limit feeding options, the Pfizer 50K program, carcass ultrasounding, and Marketing Options, as well as the History and an Overview of the Taylor Cattle Farm.

  • Plenty of after school activities for 4-H

    There are many opportunities for youth ages nine to 19 to develop new skills right after school.  The activities are held at the Henry County Cooperative Extension service from 3:30 to 5 p.m.  All of these activities are free!

  • Is it ADHD, or just acting up?

    Meet 6-year-old Jimmy. He likes to climb all over furniture, run around and often speaks out of turn. His mom reports that she is worn out because Jimmy just won’t mind. His teacher says that Jimmy doesn’t pay attention in class and won’t finish his assignments. Is he just a stubborn six-year-old boy with lots of energy or does he have a true disorder that needs medical treatment?

  • Apple season = healthier waistlines

    Grandma always said, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” and now science has proven that statement may be correct.

    In April 2008, a new study was derived from the NHANES study, a large health & nutrition database in the United States.

    The study showed that adults who eat apples and apple products, like applesauce and apple juice, had less abdominal fat, lower blood pressure, and a 27 percent reduced risk for developing metabolic syndrome, which leads to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.