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Agriculture

  • Extreme heat’s effect on older adults

    Summer is upon us, and temperatures are beginning to heat up.

    While that may be welcome news for many, combinations of high humidity and excessive heat can be dangerous for others, especially older adults.

    When a person’s body cannot properly cool itself, it increases the risks for heat-related illnesses.

    Older adults are more susceptible to hyperthermia, a common heat-related illness that results in a dangerously high body temperature.

    The most common form of hyperthermia is heatstroke.

  • Turners Station farm joins angus association

    McAlister Farms, Turners Station, is a new member of the American Angus Association, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.

    The American Angus Association, with nearly 24,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef breed association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on more than 17 million registered Angus.

  • Raising responsible children and youth

    All parents want their children to grow up to be responsible, self-sufficient adults, but the transition from childhood to adulthood—the teenage years—can be rocky for parents and children. It’s during this time that children often test parents’ limits and start requesting things like cell phones, later curfews and less adult supervision. This is also the time when many parents have to decide where they stand on many issues, financially and morally, and learn how to graciously and responsibly let go.

  • Henry County agriculture — by the numbers

    Folks, the results of the 2012 Census of Agriculture have just been released.

    I’ve had my own thoughts about how the new numbers might go, but it’s always good to work from the latest data, as reported to the National Agriculture Statistics Service by our landowners.

    The number of farms reported in 2012 was 869, down from 962 in the the 2007 Census, which bounced up from 883 in 2002. And while the average size of a farm didn’t change much, now 148 acres per farm compared to 152 in 2007, the big change is simply the number of acres in farmland.

  • 4-H communications and variety show results

    The 4-H Communications Event and Variety Show was held on April 10th at the Henry County Cooperative Extension Service office.

    Those that competed in the speech category were: Jakob Beckley in the 15-year-old category with a speech entitled “Hemp” and the potential uses and increase to the American economy.

    Katherine Buckler’s speech in the 14-year-old category was on “Water Step” a new nonprofit movement to turn old shoes into water filtration systems in third world countries.

  • Improve your health by reducing your sodium

    We are a nation that loves salt. Unfortunately, too much sodium can cause you to retain excess fluid in the body, putting pressure on your heart. This can lead to high blood pressure, one of the major risk factors for heart disease. The American Heart Association estimates that about one in three Americans will be diagnosed with high blood pressure at some point in their lives. For people with diabetes, their chances of also getting high blood pressure are doubled.

  • Meat processing plant earns financial support
  • Make your next yard sale a huge success

    Spring is a time when many people give their house a thorough cleaning. During this cleaning ritual, you may find that you’ve accumulated way too much stuff. A yard sale is a perfect way to remove household clutter and make some extra money.

    Having a yard sale does not necessarily mean it will be a success. Careful planning and preparation beforehand can help you have the most successful yard sale possible.

  • Take measures to ensure hay quality going forward

    This past winter was a tough one. We went into the winter thinking we had plenty of hay, but before it was over several producers ran out or were running close.

    In addition, the long cold periods told us through our poor cattle performance that our hay quality was not as good as we wanted or needed. True, we seem to get by pretty well with one of our mild winters, but how are we going to stay on top of things if we continue to have rough winters.

    Looking forward, what factors can we control in making higher quality hay?

  • Celebrating 100 years of volunteers, May 8

    For the past 100 years, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has been successful in recruiting, developing and retaining high quality volunteers of all ages.