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Agriculture

  • Black cherry trees can be dangerous

    When you drive through the rolling land in Henry County, you can find many black cherry trees, including some in farm fencerows. While standing upright, there is not much danger, but if one of these trees or a limb falls in a windstorm, there can be problems for livestock.

    The leaves of black cherry trees, especially wilted ones, are high in cyanic acid, which can kill livestock by depriving them of oxygen. You can reduce the likelihood of livestock losses due to wild black cherry trees by cutting them out of fencerows.

  • Applications now being accepted for ‘Farmer of the Year’

    The 2014 Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) “Farmer of the Year” application process is now open, and the organization is seeking the Commonwealth’s finest nominees for this prestigious award.

  • Area business supports 4-H

    Tractor Supply Company, in partnership with the National 4-H Council, recently announced the launch of its spring 2014 Paper Clover Campaign.

    Tractor Supply Company, the largest retail farm and ranch supply store chain in the United States, raised more than $3.2 million for 4-H programs across the country through the Paper Clover Campaigns over the last four years.

  • 4-H provides community, communication

    A broad range of communications expertise is a vital skill for today’s youth and tomorrow’s adults. 4-H helps youth improve their quality of speech and association with others, whether one-on-one in a job interview or providing a keynote address in a banquet hall.

  • Keep your livestock healthy this spring season
  • Spring clean your way to a healthier you

    Many of us would love to work more physical activity into our schedules, but between responsibilities at work and home, it can be hard to squeeze it in. The 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week most health and wellness experts recommend may seem impossible.

    Not helping matters were the short days and cold weather associated with winter. Fortunately, spring is upon us and with that comes longer days and warmer weather to encourage more outdoor physical activity.

  • Growing and cooking with herbs

    We all want to eat food that tastes good. One of the most common ways we tend to make food taste good is by adding salt. Unfortunately, most American diets are too high in sodium. Diets high in sodium can raise blood pressure, which can lead to many major health issues including heart disease. Herbs provide a great way for us to limit our sodium intake while still consuming flavorful foods.

  • Tough winter on cow herds and producers

    Near the end of most winters, diagnosticians at the veterinary labs, veterinarians, and producers see a few aged beef cows in poor body condition and a rumen full of forage material (hay) just ‘run out of gas’ with a belly full of hay and green grass just around the corner. However, this winter, they have seen these ‘malnutrition’ cases on a much more frequent basis, at a much earlier date, and have seen younger cows affected.

  • What to do to salvage your fruit crops

    Late last week, we saw apples at silver tip and peaches at the swollen bud stage. So, if you haven’t done so yet, it is time to get the dormant oil and fixed copper spray on apples and pears for San Jose scale, aphid, mite and fire blight control. It is a little too late to control peach leaf curl on peaches with fixed copper since the buds have begun to swell, but an oil spray is recommended for San Jose scale and mite control if it hasn’t been applied.

  • Helping for 100 years to navigate change

    While change isn’t easy for some people, it’s inevitable in some circumstances. Throughout the history of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service, countless agents have worked to help Kentuckians learn about and embrace important changes. This year will mark the anniversary of the passage of the Smith-Lever Act, which formally established the national Cooperative Extension Service system. The UK Cooperative Extension Service is celebrating ways that extension has helped clients change their lives for the better.