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Agriculture

  • Grazing school helps livestockers maximize potential

    Henry County’s rolling topography has always made this a great place for raising livestock, partly because our land is well suited for grazing and making hay.

    The Kentucky Grazing School, May 21-22, at the UK Research Farm near Versailles, is designed to give livestock farmers the latest information to help them maximize total production capability for their farm.

  • Celebrating a century of service through Extension

    For the past 100 years, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has focused on improving the quality of individual and family life through education, research and outreach. The history of the Cooperative Extension Service is evidence of its growth and sustainability in Kentucky.

    In 1922, the first formal “home demonstration clubs” were formed in Kentucky. In 1939 Bina Baird Foree started the first club in Henry County at Franklinton and the second one at Jericho. Today, the organization is known as the Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association.

  • Plant a tree, save a tree

    Conservation in Progress

    The Henry County Conservation District provides tree seedlings on an annual basis to the fourth grade students in the county school systems to observe Arbor/Earth Day.

  • AG Briefs

    Call for nominees

    Sand County Foundation and the Kentucky Agricultural Council (KAC) are accepting applications for the $10,000 Leopold Conservation Award program in Kentucky. The award honors Kentucky farmers, ranchers and other private landowners who voluntarily demonstrate outstanding stewardship and management of natural resources.

    Nominations must be postmarked by July 31, 2014, and mailed to Leopold Conservation Award, c/o Franklin County Conservation District, 103 Lakeview Court, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

  • New Homemaker Club takes field trip

     

    The Country Ladies are the newest Homemaker Club in Henry County.  They held their last meeting at Star View Nursery and had a wonderful lesson from John Ott on making potted Herb Gardens.  For more information on Extension Homemakers call Saundra Smith our County President or Maryellen Garrison, Henry County Extension Agent.

     

     

  • Extension plays pivotal role in land-grant system

    Even though the Cooperative Extension Service has been around for 100 years, people often ask about the connection between Extension and land-grant institutions.

    Land-grant institutions are legislated to not only teach but to engage in research and outreach. The Smith-Lever Act established the Extension Service system in 1914 to provide federal funding for land-grant universities to educate rural citizens in vocational, agricultural and home demonstration topics.

  • Celebrating 100 years of Extension Service

    We hope you’ll mark your calendar and plan to attend our open house at the Henry County Extension Office on Thursday, May 8.

    Our Open House and Celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the Cooperative Extension Service will be from 4 to 6 pm. We’ll reminisce, and we have some special guests and programs during the evening.

  • Announcing the 4-H Communications event results

    The 4-H Communications Event and Variety Show was held on April 10 at the Henry County Cooperative Extension Service office.

    Those that competed in the speech category were: Jakob Beckley in the 15 year old category with a speech entitled “Hemp” and the potential uses and increase to the American economy.

    Katherine Buckler’s speech in the 14 year old category was on “Water Step” a new nonprofit movement to turn old shoes into water filtration systems in third world countries.

  • Raising responsible children today
  • Black cherry trees can be dangerous

    When you drive through the rolling land in Henry County, you can find many black cherry trees, including some in farm fencerows. While standing upright, there is not much danger, but if one of these trees or a limb falls in a windstorm, there can be problems for livestock.

    The leaves of black cherry trees, especially wilted ones, are high in cyanic acid, which can kill livestock by depriving them of oxygen. You can reduce the likelihood of livestock losses due to wild black cherry trees by cutting them out of fencerows.