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Agriculture

  • A good walk can make all the difference

    What would you do to take 20 years off your age? The answer may be as simple as walking, according to Barry A. Franklin, Ph.D. in the UK Health Care News.

    “Starting at the age of 20, we lose about 1 percent of our aerobic fitness each year,” Dr. Franklin says. “A walking program can improve that fitness from 10 to 20 percent in three months. That’s the same as 10 to 20 years of rejuvenation.”

  • Time for the 4-H Teen Conference 2013

    With summer just around the corner, it’s time for Kentucky 4-H teens to register for the 2013 Kentucky 4-H Teen Conference.

    The conference takes place at the University of Kentucky June 10-13 and is open to all 4-H’ers who have completed the freshman through their senior year of high school.

    During the conference, 4-H members have the opportunity to experience dorm life in UK residence halls, attend educational and recreational workshops, and meet new friends from across the state.

  • Phase 1 Cost Share sign up period approaching

    From time to time, during the next few weeks, we will use this column to keep our agriculture community informed about the status and progress of the 2013 Phase I Cost Share Program fund.

    First of all, let’s discuss the different ways by which we label this program. The name we started with and still used most often is the Phase I program. Some variations of this are the Phase I Tobacco program or the Tobacco Settlement Phase I program.

  • Don’t break the bank for summertime fun

    With the days finally getting warmer, many of us are looking forward to summertime and making plans for all of the activities we want to do and events we want to attend. Summer can be a lot of fun, but many summertime adventures can also be expensive. Preparing now for summertime expenses can help soften the blow to your wallet.

  • Communication event results

    The District No. 3 4-H Communications Event was held Saturday, April 27, at Bedford Elementary School in Trimble County.

    Henry County was well represented in the following speech, demonstration and variety show categories. Kassidy Allen gave a speech entitled “Equine Eye” in which she received a blue ribbon. 

    Camyrn McManis gave a speech on “Video Games, Good or Bad” and received a blue and champion.  Camryn also gave a demonstration on “Photography Basics” receiving a blue and champion. 

  • Increase fruit and veggies in diet

    We all know that we should eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, but many of us don’t get the recommended servings.

    Fruits and vegetables are important to our diet, because they provide necessary nutrients and are high in dietary fiber and low in calories, fat and cholesterol. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that you make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

  • Sharpshooters show at challenge

    Henry County Sharpshooters Attend Youth Hunter Education Challenge

  • Poisonous plants in pasture & fields

    Cattleman’s Meeting

    The Henry County Cattleman’s Association announces its April meeting 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 22, at the Henry County Extension Office. As always, a great program of industry news is being planned. On the program will be a veterinarian report, along with FFA, Extension, FSA, and an update on Phase One tobacco funds, along with a sponsor report. The sponsored meal will feature beef products. Contact the Extension Office at 845-2811 by 4:00 pm Friday to reserve your spot.

     

  • Tips for boosting pasture production

    The three primary nutrients required for plant growth are nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient necessary for photosynthesis and building protein, and it has long been known that increasing nitrogen in the soil has been proven to greatly increase pasture production.

  • Remembering the 1974 tornadoes and their destruction

    Thirty nine years ago today, April 3, 1974, many lives and landscapes in Kentucky changed forever, and as I write this on Monday, April 1, I remember that so much changed in Campbellsburg exactly 39 years ago, too.

    It was irony and coincidence that placed me in touch with both days of disastrous tornadoes.