.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Volunteers gathered Saturday at the Relay For Life kick-off benefiting cancer research held at the Henry County Fairground’s 4-H building.
    Relay chair Chesi Woods, flanked by her mother, Kim Jewell, husband Vincent and their kids, explained why research counts then introduced speaker, attorney and cancer survivor Virginia Lee “Jenny” Harrod.

  • Older adults are often burdened with a variety of health conditions, sometimes coupled with loneliness, anxiety and depression, according to a news release. A strategy to engage primary care practitioners in meeting behavioral health needs of older adults is at the heart of a new federal grant awarded to the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging (ISHOA).

  • With tax season in full swing, Attorney General Andy Beshear and AARP Kentucky issued a scam alert to help Kentucky families protect their tax returns from being stolen by scammers, according to a news release.
    Beshear and AARP officials said tax identity fraud occurs when someone uses your Social Security number to file a tax return in your name, before you file in order to steal your refund.
    Tax-related scams, including identity fraud are reported in Kentucky, with more than 120 reports made to the Office of the Attorney General last year, representing families in 43 counties.

  • Students and Friends of the Library pitched in on projects during the first annual Make a Difference Day, Saturday, Feb. 10, at the Henry County Public Library.
    Volunteers made greeting cards for a nursing home, toys for an animal shelter, cookies for first responders, bookmarks for the bookmobile and toiletries for a women and children’s shelter.
    Henry County High School seniors Gabe Adams, 18, and Emma Topp, 17, wanted to give back to the community. “The library has always been here for me, so I want to give back,” Adams said.

  • After completing sophomore-level education, Zach Castillo was out of school for two years before Henry County Judge Executive John Brent referred him to the Kentucky Youth Career Center (KYCC), according to a news release. There, he worked with staff members to set and achieve personal and professional goals.
    Castillo now attends Job Corps, which is the largest free residential education and job training program for young adults ages 16 to 24.
    At Job Corps, Castillo is working toward earning his high school diploma and CDL certification.

  • After a potentially life threatening bout with her Crohn’s disease and septic shock in 2016, Lyndi Carnal pulled through with a heart to help others.
    Mother Tiffany also found a cause to work on, after fearing the doctors relied far too much on addictive medications in her daughter’s treatment. Tiffany went on a crusade to promote natural alternatives to pharmaceuticals.
    Doctors diagnosed Lyndi with Crohn’s at 14. She faced numerous hospitalizations due to complications from the autoimmune disease. At 17, Lyndi was gravely ill in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital during December 2016.

  • It’s not easy being a Wildcat fan when you live in the Music City — especially when you work for another SEC school.
    No matter what, Rachel Sims, an alumna of the communication sciences and disorders graduate program in the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences, will always bleed blue, according to a University of Kentucky News profile of the Wildcat alumna.
    Originally from Eminence, Sims now lives in Nashville, where she works for Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a speech language pathologist (SLP).