.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Battling addiction

    Pastors across the county hope Oct. 4 will be a changing day in people’s lives.
    Celebrate Recovery, a Christ-centered 12-step program designed to address all addictions, will begin on Oct. 4. The program will be held every Tuesday night at 6:30 p.m. at New Castle First Baptist Church, 47 East Cross Main in New Castle.
    Those who attend can expect a meal, worship and time in small-groups reflective of their addiction.

  • Celebrating a milestone birthday

    It’s not every day that someone gets to mark 100 years on this earth. But next month one resident at Twin Oaks Assisted Living will do just that, and administrators at the facility are asking the county to join in the centennial celebration.
    On Oct. 14, Aline Stivers will turn 100 years old, and Leanne Yancey, community manager of Twin Oaks, wants it to be a memorable occasion.

  • CELTIC FESTIVAL AND HIGHLAND GAMES
  • Lady Cats beat Walton; lose to Owen Co.

    The Henry County Lady Cats traveled to Sugar Bay Golf Course in Warsaw Sept. 12 to take on the Walton-Verona Lady Bearcats and came away with a 187-237 win.
    Maddie Hensley, who shot a 35 in the nine-hole match, led the Lady Cats. Bayleigh Boyer shot 43, Nikki Perkinson shot 45 and Carleigh Peyton shot 64. Hannah Marowelli shot 66 as the Lady Cats’ fifth golfer.
    “I was very proud of our team’s performance at Sugar Bay,” HCHS Coach April Berry said. “All of the girls were striking the ball well. The challenging part of Sugar Bay is the small and quick greens.

  • Grant restricts use of The Locker for public

    Amvets of America is still looking for a location in which to establish a post, but it likely won’t be in The Locker in New Castle.
    Representative from Amvets attended the New Castle City Commission meeting Sept. 12 to present a proposal to the town to use the property at 24 Main Street as its post.

  • Grant restricts use of The Locker for public

    Amvets of America is still looking for a location in which to establish a post, but it likely won’t be in The Locker in New Castle.
    Representative from Amvets attended the New Castle City Commission meeting Sept. 12 to present a proposal to the town to use the property at 24 Main Street as its post.

  • Redefining the ‘B’ word at HCMS

    It’s a word that gets tossed around a lot and is often misapplied, but administrators at Henry County Middle School want their students to understand exactly what bullying means.
    “Bulllying has become a catch-phrase,” said HCMS Guidance Counselor Kim Lineman. “Any time one person has a conflict with another, it’s called bullying, but there is a difference between bullying and peer conflict, which happens and is going to happen.”

  • Frontier-era Facelift

    One of the earliest homes in New Castle is getting a facelift, just weeks after the National Parks Service recognized the downtown as historic.
    In the 1790s, James and Thomas Pearce, two pioneers from Virginia, built four two-storied log cabins and settled what would become New Castle, according to the recently approved application for the downtown’s inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Three of the four log cabins still stand, originally used as homes and trading posts, remaining the oldest buildings in town.

  • News briefs for Sept. 14, 2016

    Clay shoot to benefit Crusade for Children
    The Steel Technologies firing range will host a Crusade for Children fundraiser in memory of late Eminence Fire Chief Gary Lucas Oct. 15 at 9 a.m.
    The cost for the Eminence Fire Clay Shoot is $25 per person with first, second, third and top gun prizes awards.
    The fundraiser will also offer a fun shoot of five birds for $5.
    The event will be held at 1363 Elm Street, Eminence.

  • Family holding benefit to improve Brierly’s housing situation

    Family and friends will hold a benefit for Robert Brierly, due to his living situation and continuing health issues, according to information from Jennifer Allgeier.
    Brierly lost his home after the death of his wife a few years ago, and he lived in a daughter’s basement until she sold her home, Allgeier said. For a little while after that, he lived in a camper.
    Brierly is in remission from prostate and bladder cancer, and he has diabetes and cervical spine issues, which led to surgery on his lower back. He spent six weeks in the hospital.