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Local News

  • Truth or Consequences

    Over 200 students were accused of drug and or alcohol abuse Thursday at school. Some were arrested and incarcerated and others expelled, while a few were hospitalized. Unfortunately, a handful of students died as a result of overdoses.
    Freshmen students at both Henry County and Eminence high schools participated in “Truth and Consequences,” a youth enrichment program designed to show students the consequences of getting involved with drugs and alcohol. Henry County 4-H Extension Agent Cathy Toole coordinated the activity.

  • Local banks merge

    On Monday, March 20, Citizens Union Bancorp, Shelbyville, announced it had successfully completed the merger of Citizens Union Bank (CUB), Shelbyville, and First Farmers Bank, Owenton, according to a news release.  

    Citizens Union Bank and First Farmers Bank have been sister organizations under the same Holding Company, Citizens Union Bancorp, since 1994.

    A letter to First Farmers Bank customers prior to the merger focused on what customers could expect from the merger.  

  • Bank hires three new tellers

    United Citizens Bank and Trust, headquartered in Campbellsburg, recently announced its newest hires.

    These include:

    •Alyson (Aly) Stanley joined United Citizens Bank in November 2016 as the drive-through teller at the Campbellsburg office. Aly is continuing her education online with Midway University and resides in Eminence.

    •Kimberly (Kim) Hanner joined United Citizens Bank as a part-time teller in December 2016.  Kim resides in Campbellsburg with her husband Thomas.

  • Tree seedling giveaway aims to reduce lost ash trees

    The Henry County Conservation District and the Kentucky Division of Forestry provide tree seedlings to fourth grade students in the Henry County Public Schools and Eminence Independent Schools systems each year.

    Each student receives a plastic sleeve with pine and oak seedings inside.

    This project reaches over 200 students and culminates in trees planted throughout the county, as well as serves as a teaching tool to practice conservation at a young age.

  • Not so weird science

     

    As the host school of this month’s Henry County Board of Education meeting, fourth grade students at Campbellsburg Elementary School were excited to greet board members and other guests with a science fair in the school’s cafeteria.

  • Fiscal Court hears state's plan for county's secondary roads

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will try to pave the way for rural secondary roads in Henry County to last longer before needing a traditional resurfacing, according to discussion at the March 21 Henry County Fiscal Court meeting.

    Matt Bullock, the transportation cabinet’s chief district engineer, shared details about the funding and the priority projects for Henry County’s rural secondary roads, or RS for short, for fiscal year 2018.

  • EIS partners with military academy

    It’s been several years now that Eminence Independent Schools (EIS) has partnered with the Whitney M. Young Job Corps Center in Shelbyville to provide instructional support to the facility. Now the district has agreed to take on another off-district partner, one with a military approach near Fort Knox, the Kentucky National Guard Bluegrass ChalleNGe Academy (BCA).

  • Thorntons proposed in Pendleton

    The Henry County Planning Commission will hold a public hearing in April on two requests in connection to a proposal to build a Thorntons at the intersection of Interstate 71 and Ky. 153 in Pendleton.

    The planning commission published a notice to change the property at the southwest corner of the Pendleton intersection from A-1 agricultural to I-2 heavy industrial to accommodate the proposed development of the service business.

  • The ongoing fight against addiction

    “If this could happen to my family, this could happen to any family,” said Kim Hinkel of her experience with drug abuse. “Addiction can happen to anyone at anytime.”

  • New poultry restrictions

    In the last few weeks, avian influenza was detected twice in Tennessee and once in Kentucky, and because of this the Kentucky State Veterinarian has placed movement restrictions for poultry within the state and coming into the state. 

    Below is the information that was sent to the agriculture extension agents from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture Office of the State Veterinarian.