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Local News

  • Fairgrounds alcohol penalty to be financial

    Law enforcement officers won’t become a permanent fixture at the 4-H Fairgrounds to keep alcohol off the premises for weekend parties. Instead, Henry County can use a financial penalty against flagrant violators.
    The parks committee, led by Magistrate Jason Stanley, met to review the use of the 4-H building for private parties prior to the fiscal court’s full meeting Feb. 17, but the committee did not recommend any outright penalties against people who ignored the fairground’s ban on alcohol.

  • iLEAD Academy prepares to launch

    Incoming high school freshman from Carroll, Gallatin, Henry, Owen and Trimble Counties now have a groundbreaking choice about where to go to high school, according to the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative.  The superintendents of the five school districts announced Feb. 10 they are opening Kentucky’s first regional career academy, known as iLEAD, so their students can pursue competitive advantage for the highest-demand, highest-wage jobs in Kentucky’s Golden Triangle.

  • Heroin becoming a greater concern in Henry County as overdoses rise

    Though Henry County has been spared from the worst of Kentucky’s heroin epidemic, the illicit narcotic has still extracted a human cost here.
    Use can often lead to addiction, crimes to support the drug habit and even death. The victims of heroin leave behind loved ones to cope with the loss as best they can.

  • Live, from Austin

    When Rob Banta picked up his first guitar, playing didn’t come naturally right away. But now he’s issuing an indie-country concept album and getting ready to embark on a tour to promote it.
    The tour will bring him within about 76 miles from where he grew up on a farm in Smithfield, when he stops for an April 1 show at the Southgate House Revival in Newport, across the Ohio River from Cincinnati.

  • Duncan retires, Kemper takes over as chief

    Leadership at the Eminence Police Department will change when Chief Carey Duncan retires at the end of February and Chief Kevin Kemper officially takes charge.
    Duncan’s second retirement
    This will be Duncan’s second retirement from law enforcement after capping a 24-year career with the Kentucky State Police, with 20 years of that being stationed at Post 5.

  • EPD drug bust nets four so far

    Four people have been charged with trafficking in controlled substances, after the Eminence Police Department obtained sealed indictments in a continuing investigation, according to Kevin Kemper, the agency’s next chief.
    Those charged include
    • Keevin Foree, 44, of Eminence
    Foree was arrested on an indictment for trafficking heroin during a Feb. 9 traffic stop on Highway 55.

  • Help Center volunteers brave subzero temperatures

    A well-timed post on Facebook by Marla Armstrong helped the Henry County Help Center swell its ranks of volunteers during last week’s snow days. Armstrong was surprised and pleased the post reached about 3,600 users, even though the Help Center has less than 1,000 likes on its page. It also resulted in about 15 volunteers who would ordinarily be at work or school coming out on Thursday to provide assistance in lugging boxes out to the vehicles in 5-degree weather and rearranging shelves inside. Armstrong added there are plenty of opportunities to volunteer at the help center.

  • Spotlight shines on Hartford’s good works

    When Eminence Elementary Principal Mike Doran asked the 800 students to stand if they’ve been affected by the work of Debbie Hartford, almost every youth gathered in the gym Thursday for a special assembly rose to their feet.
    Most people probably know that Hartford gets involved as the director of Family Resources and Youth Services, Doran said. Maybe they can think of eight or nine ways she works to improve Eminence, but Doran could think of more than 21 tasks that Hartford takes on.

  • Grant gets more jail time

    Brandon Grant came to court Thursday expecting to be sentenced and released, but instead will have to serve an additional 40 days.
    Grant, who pleaded guilty to two counts of torture of a dog or cat with serious physical injury or death in December, had been released from jail pending his sentencing hearing. When he missed a required visit with his probation officer on Dec. 23, a bench warrant was issued for his arrest. He was taken into custody and had been in jail since Jan. 23 when he appeared in front of Henry County Circuit Court Judge Karen Conrad last week.

  • Bedford man arrested in drug bust

    On Feb. 13, Kentucky State Police Post 5 received an anonymous tip in reference to possible drug activity at 76 Kenlee Drive, according to a news release from KSP.  Upon arrival, troopers made contact with the homeowner, James Singleton, 53. During the subsequent search of the residence, $15,275 in cash, approximately 2.5 pounds of marijuana, 528 pseudoephedrine tablets, items used in the cultivation of marijuana, illegal drug paraphernalia and other narcotics were located.