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Local News

  • Bandwidth too low for C’Burg WiFi

    Bandwidth – or, rather, the lack of it – is the root of what’s ailing the free wireless Internet system being provided by the City of Campbellsburg.

    That was the diagnosis given Monday to City Council by Brent Graves of PoweredOn in Carrollton, who was hired more than a year ago to set up the system meant to provide city residents with free wireless Internet access.

  • Terri Smith enters guilty plea

    During a pretrial hearing Monday in Henry County Circuit Court, Terri L. Smith, 51, of Campbellsburg, waived her right to a jury trial and entered a guilty plea to one count of second-degree cruelty to animals, a Class A misdemeanor.

  • Frommeyer retiring after 28 years in Eminence district

    It’s no joke: On April 1, Steve Frommeyer will retire as principal at Eminence High School and Middle School.

    In an interview Monday, Frommeyer said the decision to leave the post after 22 years ranks as one of the most difficult decisions of his life.

    The toughest, he said, was the decision to move away from Richmond, Ky., where he had earned a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree at Eastern Kentucky University, and where he met and married his wife, Jenifer.

  • A laptop for every student

    Eminence High School will take a big leap forward, in terms of technology, when students return for the 2012-13 school year.

    Superintendent Buddy Berry said the Board of Education last month approved his “One-to-One” plan, which will assign an Apple MacBook laptop computer to every student in grades nine through 12 next year. The students will have access to their computers 24 hours a day, seven days a week to use in class during instruction and at home for projects or to conduct online research.

  • Students probe cell phone use in school

    Technology in the classroom can be a double-edged sword. It obviously has its merits, as the number of ways to use computers in schools has increased exponentially in just a few short years.

    But it also can be distracting. More and more students have their own cell phones, and most of these devices can do so much more than just allow phone calls. Games, music and Internet access anytime, anywhere, can prove to be too tempting for students to ignore.

  • Henry County is home to UK basketball history

    Submitted by Jim Griesch
    For the Local

    The oldest living University of Kentucky basketball letterman may live in Henry County.

    Layton “Mickey” Rouse, a member of the Cats basketball squads from 1937-40, now lives Twin Oaks in New Castle.
    Rouse is 94.  Basil Hayden who was 103 when he died in 2003, was UK’s first All American in1921.

    Rouse wasn’t any slouch either. He was captain of Adolph Rupp’s 1939-40 Southeastern Conference regular season and tournament champions.

  • City to seek CDBG funding

    The city of Eminence will seek a Community Development Block Grant to complete much-needed upgrades to its system after a state funding request was not included in the state budget.

    Monday night, the City Council voted to puruse the grant.

    When the House Appropriations and Revenue committee met last week, one thing was certain: the city of Eminence would not receive funding for the sorely needed sewer project.

  • Want to help victims of March 2 tornadoes?

    Several organizations are teaming up to aid the families and communites hit by tornadoes on March 2.

    Henry County High School

    HCHS is organizing a collection effort to assist the region’s tornado victims. They ask for the following:

    Work gloves, toiletries, towels, plastic storage bins, nonperishable snacks, bottled water, diapers, blankets, and anything else you feel will benefit the storm victims.

    Items may be brought to Henry County High School until March 16.

  • For Berry, ‘It All Turns on Affection’

    Since the 1960s, he has been a voice for rural America, and in 2011, President Barack Obama dubbed him “a voice for the land,” when presenting Wendell Berry with the National Humanities Medal.

    Berry, of Port Royal, has been honored again for his works, his advocacy and defense of the rural lifestyle and his commitment to the land, when, in February, the National Endowment for the Humanities selected him to give the 41st Jefferson Lecture in Humanities.

  • A lifelong love

    Since graduating from Eminence High School in 1979, Robert Pettit has spent his entire career in law enforcement.

    In a telephone interview Monday, Pettit, who now lives in North Carolina, said he recalls writing an essay in sixth grade, in which he told about wanting to be a Kentucky State Police trooper when he grew up. “I knew at a very young age that’s what I wanted to do.”