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Local News

  • New Five Star in Eminence set to open July 25

     

     

    The new Five Star location can’t open soon enough for patrons who regularly wait for gas on the cramped lot of the old station. The new location, just across the street, will have not just more space, but will offer more choices, too.

  • HCPS: ‘BYOD’ in 2012-13

    By BRAD BOMAN
    Reporter/Photographer
    The increasing presence of technology, such as iPhones, iPads and smart phones, that are available to students can be daunting. But the Henry County Public School Board decided Monday that this resource should be tapped to engage and enhance the educational process.
    The board adopted a new “Bring your own device” policy, similar to policies in districts across the nation that allow students to use their own technology at school for finding information and other resources on the Internet.

  • Officials mark opening of shared shelter
  • Businesses entice diners to eat out

    Despite an uncertain economy, new and expanding businesses in Henry County give residents a reason for dining out.

    Country Collectibles

    Steve Losch never intended to expand his business to include hommade smoked barbecue, live music or outside seating for 50. But with the new county liquor law, he saw a way to keep residents from dining out in another county.

  • Mahoney state’s Driver Trainer of Year

    William Mahoney, a vital part of the Henry County Public Schools’ Transportation Department for 25 years, received Kentucky’s Driver Trainer of the Year award June 27. 

    Presented by the Student Transportation Association of Kentucky and the Kentucky Department of Education at STAK’s annual conference, the award recognizes one school transportation employee each year who has provided outstanding leadership as a trainer.

  • It’s a family tradition for the Clarks

    Joe Clark and his sons have their own way of doing things.

    Whether it’s his dry stone masonry or his sons’ music, the Clarks’ craftsmanship reaches deeper than the topsoil of trend and builds more on a foundation of tradition.

    Clark is a self-made man who started as a stonemason in 1985 when he repaired a rock wall in Owenton for the state. While he worked on the job, he didn’t know it was an historic wall or that it would lead him to his own family business in dry stone masonry.

  • Burn ban issued

    Despite a reprieve from the oppressive heat, Henry County is under a no burn ban.

    Within the last month, most of Henry County has received less than two inches of rain with temperatures averaging in the 90s.

    Judge Executive John Logan Brent issued the ban on July 5. The order will stay in effect until the county receives sufficient rainfall. The ban for all outdoor burning includes fireworks.

  • Antiques are good, old fun

    Antique tractors don’t spit fire and smoke like their modern diesel counterparts, but for tractor pull competitors like Reuben Yount and Jimmy Hance antique tractor pulls are a time for fun with family and friends.

    “It isn’t like the old days when there wasn’t any rules at tractor pulls. The competitions weren’t exactly safe,” Yount said, “and there isn’t any drunks fighting with each other.”

  • Providing a Capstone for local food

    Capstone produce in Campbellsburg will provide local produce for the Forecastle Music Festival, which begins Friday in Louisville.

    For owner David Neville, this is another step toward bringing locally produced sustainable agriculture into the mainstream conversation.

    The festival hosts three days of art, music and activism minded attractions, which include a mission germane to Capstone produce’s role toward creating a marketplace for sustainable agriculture.

  • Stivers going to ‘start waking people up’

     “You’re probably going to start getting some calls.”

    That, Henry County Sheriff’s Department Detective Danny Stivers predicted, will happen when the HCSD starts patrolling Pleasureville at 3 and 4 a.m. In particular, he warned that angry parents, whose children are being returned to them in the wee hours of the morning, might be a little miffed.

    “After 2 a.m., if they’re under 18, we’re going to start waking people up,” Stivers told the Pleasureville City Commission.