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Local News

  • Helping Hands

    Joan Lacey once told Henry County Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt she wished she could meet one decent person in this world who truly loves animals.

    He handed her a mirror.

    Every other week, the Pleasureville resident loads up animals at the Henry County Animal Shelter and takes them to Bullitt County. There, the crated dogs — an average total of 60 to 80 per week from three counties — are placed on a transport that will take them six hours north to Chicago.

    Every six weeks, Lacey drives that transport to the Windy City.

  • ‘Am I going to die?’

    Alex Mason started losing her appetite not just for food but school and her mother knew something was wrong.

    Shelly Mason said she knew her child’s personality well enough that the change in behavior didn’t make sense. Within a six-week time frame, Alex, then 9, didn’t want to do her homework, had shortness of breath and was really tired. She stopped eating her dinner. Her mother thought maybe it was hormones or that Alex was getting bullied at school. Knowing her child saved her daughter’s life.

  • A farmer’s work is never done

    Work doesn’t stop on the farm.

    Despite the winter conditions and a reprieve from the growing season, planning for production and livestock keep county farmers busy.

    “We are still stripping for about the next 2.5 weeks,” said Mark Roberts, local tobacco, corn and livestock farmer. “We put our cover crop down shortly after cutting tobacco in October. We are getting things ready for the rest of the year.”

  • Patels are living the American Dream one shop at a time

    As a child Mike Patel heard that everyone in America was rich.

    At 19, he would take a chance on the American dream and leave engineering school.

    “My aunt had applied for us to get visas in the 80s,” Patel said. “It took 15 years for us to get an opening to come. My dad came to me while I was in college in Nagpur and asked me if I wanted to go. It was a hard decision.”

  • Clements named Cook’s employee of the year

    Bo Clements can’t stand not working.

    Clements started working at the Eminence Cook’s in 1989. He left working in dairy and tobacco farming for a spot in shipping and receiving. Clements will tell anyone the only thing he cares about is pleasing the customer, his boss and staying busy.
    “I started helping here delivering lawn mowers. I was fresh off the farm and didn’t know much,” Clements said. “I’ve been here over 20 years and I’m just glad to have a job.”

  • Henry man indicted in Shelbyville
  • CVS to present plan to Triple S

    Four months after taking over Smith-McKenney in the Village Plaza shopping center in Shelbyville, CVS will move its store to the intersection of U.S. 60 and the Shelbyville Bypass, where the condemned Wesley Apartments now stand.

    The company presented its long-awaited development plan to the Triple S Planning Commission at its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Stratton Center.

    The plan calls for a 13,225-square-foot retail center, with a pharmacy and drive-through, and includes 69 parking spaces.

  • Public will not get milked by hefty dairy prices

    By DAVE TAYLOR
    Landmark News Service
    The potential hefty price rise predicted recently for milk will not occur anytime soon, according to local and statewide dairy leaders.
    The average gallon of milk costs about $3, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Recently, national media outlets had predicted a fear of prices as high as $7 per gallon due to issues related to a farm bill that was tied into the “Fiscal Cliff” in Washington.

  • Life is a cherry bowl

    Woodworking keeps Neal Morris alive and he refuses to sit still.

    The numerous finished woodworking products speak to his mastery as a craftsman, but witnessing his process reveals Morris’ is a true Renaissance man.

  • KSP RAIDs drivers

     For Trooper BradArterburn, public affairs officer for Post 5, lowering traffic fatalities doesn’t mean writing more traffic tickets but raising awareness about dangerous driving habits.

    Kentucky State Police started a campaign for removing distracted, impaired and aggressive drivers in November. The Operation RAID — Remove Aggressive, Impaired and Distracted drivers — strategy combines compiled local crash data with an increased law enforcement presence.