Local News

  • The Caplinger House

    The Henry County History Center can celebrate its mission of preserving the past for the future as the center’s house turns 150 this year.

    James Nelson Caplinger built the house, which houses the Henry County History Center, in 1863. Caplinger built two additional exact houses in New Castle for each of his three daughters.

  • Haunted house?

    Every town has a collection of haunted tales hinged on horrific, historical happenings and the buildings that house them. But they don’t all  have a paranormal group actually investigate those places.

    Sight and Sound Paranormal came to the Henry County Courthouse last Friday night and Oct. 16 to investigate claims ranging from disembodied voices, footsteps, doors slamming, objects being thrown down hallways and an elevator that moves on its own .

  • Halloween attraction benefits shelters

    By Brad Bowman


    Brandon Graves wants to help animals… and scare you to death while he does it.

    Graves, 11, got his dog Lucky, a Cockapoo, from the Henry-Trimble County Animal Shelter after a raid on a local puppy mill in 2011.

  • EIS sued over tax

    Eminence resident Justin Atchinson has filed a lawsuit against Eminence Independent School District challenging the tax levy.

    Perry Arnold, who represents Atchison, said on Tuesday, “A pending lawsuit has been filed against Eminence Indenpendent School District challenging the tax levy because of the public notice and public hearing.”

    Arnold said it was his position “for Mr. Atchinson that they did not comply with statute,” regarding posting of the public notice and public hearing.

  • CU sewer project to include C’Burg

    Carrollton Utilities indicated their intent to seek funding for a regional sewer project that would, among other things, extend sewer service in Campbellsburg to the north side of I-71.

    During an informal meeting with Campbellsburg mayor Rex Morgan and concerned property and business owners, CU representative Terry Roach said a regional approach will make funding more likely. “(Projects) score higher when they’re regional,” he said.

  • Roosevelt Institute awards Freedom Medal to Wendell Berry

    Henry County native, and celebrated author, Wendell Berty has been awarded the Freedom Medal by the Roosevelt Institute in New York, N.Y.

    The award, presented last week, is part of a biennial ceremony that began honoring recipients in 1964 based on principles laid out in President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, delivered to Congress in January 1941.

  • Ren Faire focuses on commerce, community

    The Kentucky Renaissance Faire continues using commerce as a way to focus on community.
    Ed and Linda Frederick and Holly Sprabary, Directors of the Kentucky Renaissance Faire, have put their ideas together at the round table for possible expansion and more entertaining events next season.
    Eminence Festivals and the Kentucky Highland Renaissance Fair will host the 5th Annual Halloween Festival on Oct. 26 at the fairgrounds with a collaborative cast of community and school organizations.

  • Take 5: Pat Wallace

    Basic Bio

    Harrodsburg native
    Graduated from Mercer County High School
    EKU bachelor’s in History and English
    HCHS English Teacher
    Executive Director Henry County Chamber of Commerce

    How did you end up teaching in Henry County and later at the chamber?

  • Smith-Berry hosting Susan G. Komen benefit

    There will be a Halloween Bash Benefit for the Susan G. Komen Foundation from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at Smith-Berry Vineyard and Winery on Drennon Road in New Castle. Come out and enjoy Halloween fun with a costume contest and enjoy dinner from 5-6 p.m. and music by Melody Resurrection. Tickets are $25 plus tax, with 20 percent of the cost of each ticket donated to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For more information call 845-7091.

  • Campbellsburg bristles about economic development payment

    Campbellsburg will honor its commitment of $2,500 per year toward economic development in Henry County, though the commission had reservations about doing so.

    In September, Mayor Rex Morgan expressed concern about an invoice the city had received from Kentucky Connected, the six-county regional economic development group.