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Local News

  • Terri Smith requests jury trial

    The Henry County woman charged with more than 200 counts of animal cruelty will take her case to trial.
    On Monday, Feb. 20, Terri L. Smith of Campbellsburg, through her attorney, asked for a jury trial in her case, which consists of 218 counts of first degree animal cruelty, a Class A misdemeanor.

    Henry County Attorney Virginia Harrod said Smith’s attorney, George Carter, arrived for Monday’s hearing and immediately requested a jury trial.

  • Eminence council considers STAR amendment

    Any Eminence business that sells alcohol may soon be required to have its employees STAR-trained.

    That would include the city’s liquor stores, as well as other businesses that sell package beer. Server Training in Alcohol Regulations already had been part of the city’s alcohol ordinance for restaurants, but one council member felt that the requirement should go a little further.

    Currently, the regulation requires only that one employee per shift be STAR trained.

  • HCSO pulls weed sent by UPS

    A UPS delivery from California resulted in the arrest of a Louisville woman in Henry County last week.

    Henry County Sheriff Danny Cravens said Sarah A. Scott, 33, was arrested after she allegedly accepted a UPS delivery containing 30 pounds of marijuana.

    The marijuana carries a street value of about $40,000 to $45,000.

    Cravens said the San Bernadino, Calif., Sheriff’s Office contacted him last week to notify him of a possible drug-trafficking operation.

  • Timing is everything for EHS senior

    They say timing is everything, and so it was for Eminence High School senior Alyssa Jones.

    Jones, who has been involved in her church choir since she was very young and began taking voice lessons from Ruth Ann Mills-Moore in New Castle as a fourth-grader, participated in the music program during her three years at Henry County High School.

    Last summer, she and her family moved to the house in Eminence where her late grandmother lived. That meant transferring from HCHS to EHS for her senior year.

  • Jury finds Gibson not guilty

    After more than nine hours of deliberation, a jury found Johnny Lee Gibson not guilty of five felony charges related to a 2008 home invasion in Smithfield.

    Rob Riley, who defended Gibson, said his client was “ecstatic that he finally had his day in court,” and that Gibson was “happy as a clam” with the verdict.

  • News Briefs

    Henry County Middle School
    SBDM Parent Election

    On Feb. 10, from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the HCMS main office two parent representatives will be elected to the school’s Site Based Decision Making Council.  

    Any parent or guardian of a 6th, 7th or 8th grade student for the 2012-2013 school year is eligible to vote and/or be elected to these positions.

  • News Briefs

    Henry County Middle School
    SBDM Parent Election

    On Feb. 10, from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the HCMS main office two parent representatives will be elected to the school’s Site Based Decision Making Council.  

    Any parent or guardian of a 6th, 7th or 8th grade student for the 2012-2013 school year is eligible to vote and/or be elected to these positions.

  • RUFFLED FEATHERS?

    A broohaha over the Pleasureville City Clerk’s salary may have started over a letter about chickens.

    For the fourth month in a row, payroll policies and the actions of the city clerk took center stage at the Pleasureville City Commission meeting.

    After a second reading of an ordinance that will amend the salary range for the city clerk’s position to $10,000 to $30,000, the commission approved the reading 3-1, with Commissioner Pam Bramblett casting the lone opposing vote.

  • Two candidates to vie for circuit clerk

    Two candidates will face one another for the sole local race on the May primary ballot.

    Nick Hawkins and Gina Lyle are the Democratic candidates for circuit clerk. The incumbent clerk, Mary Lou Roberts, is retiring and not seeking reelection.

    For Lyle, filing to run for circuit clerk was a “natural next step,” in her 23-year career with the circuit clerk’s office. “It’s something that I’ve worked toward for the last 23 years,” Lyle said.

  • 'THAT GRIEF IS NEVER GOING TO LEAVE’

    Dr. Karen Shay knows, all too well, the dangers of prescription drug abuse.
    Her daughter Sarah died after overdosing on methadone. She was 19.
    Shay, who lives in Morehead, shared her story, and her daughter’s story, in an appearance with Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway at Henry County High School last week. The two were on hand, specifically, to talk to the school’s freshmen.