.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Bardstown — More than just My Old Kentucky Home

    In this week’s one tank trip, I wanted show off some of the lesser known jewels of Bardstown and Nelson County.

    Bardstown’s usual suspects — My Old Kentucky Home State Park, Federal Hill, Heaven Hill Distillery and the Stephen Foster Story all merit a trip — but there are other attractions you don’t want to miss.

  • Basement debate continues

    A debate over the rental of the Pleasureville City Hall basement continued Monday night, ending with the city commission voting 2-1 to allow caterer Gary Grigsby to pay $100 per month.

    Mayor Rodney Young said he spoke with Grigsby, who rented the space previously, and that the caterer asked to rent the basement for $100 per month.

    Young justified the rental price — $50 lower than what Grigsby previously paid — saying that “about once a week, he has to come up and clean. You’ve got to clean every so often.”

  • HCMS, Eastern get energy upgrades

    Henry County students attending Eastern Elementary and Henry County Middle School will notice green upgrades at their schools this week.

    The Henry County Board of Education hired CMTA Energy Solutions with Henry County alumni Jeremy Kelley, CMTA project engineer, to change out the systems that Henry County Superintendent Tim Abrams said were outdated.

  • Blackberry Smoke will set field party on fire

    Blackberry Smoke’s music calls from the old, traditional hymns of country gospel and bluegrass harmony with the sweat and grit of rock ‘n’ roll.

    Blackberry Smoke will headline Froggy Field Party 5 Saturday at the Kentucky Renaissance Fair grounds.

    Lead vocalist and guitarist Charlie Starr just wants to write good music.

  • Take 5 with Michael Doran

    Bio

    Grew up in an inner city housing project Clarksdale in East Louisville

    Trinity High School Graduate

    Work 16 years as an administrator

    Bellarmine graduate and masters and certification at Spalding University Master

    Principle at Eminence Elementary 13 years

    Company owner of food vendor stands at south wing of food court by the commercial exhibits at Kentucky State Fair

     

    Why did you go into education?

  • Daniel Boone National Forest’s gore-gous

    A retreat to the woods quiets the mind and feeds the soul.

    Over my lifetime, the Red River Gorge and the Daniel Boone National Forest have provided me a retreat demanding less than a two-hour drive into its hills and hollows.

  • From my grill to yours — the perfect steak

    Cooking engages our most primal instincts.

    The elaborate dance of flame and smoke with glowing coals incites memories of family cookouts, holidays and seasonal nostalgia.

    In my 15 years of working as a professional chef, writing too many menus and standing on my feet for long hours, I never lost the joy from creating and cooking.

  • Shaking with the Shakers

    The Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill offers a retreat in time to 19th century living and a scenic landscape to clear one’s head.

    The village has more than 3,000 acres with 34 Shaker buildings, which stand as museum exhibits, overnight lodging for the inn, a restaurant, crafts and gift shops, with barns and corn cribs that are still in use.

    The private nonprofit foundation at Shaker Village continues to preserve and protect the village grounds and offers 40 miles of hiking trails with 1,000 acres of restored native prairie grasses and wildflowers.

  • Peace and quiet?

    When Kathy Jacobs and her husband moved to Henry County 16 years ago, they found the quiet and tranquility they’d been looking for.

    “I like it here, and I’m not going back north,” she told the Henry County Fiscal Court on July 16. But along Blueridge Road near Valley View Landfill, something has been disturbing that peace and tranquility.

  • McClamroch retires after 34 years

    Donna McClamroch always knew she wanted to be a teacher.

    As a child, she loved playing school. When she grew into an adult, she brought that love for teaching to Eminence 34 years ago.

    McClamroch graduated from Valley Station High School in Louisville — a school with an average of 400 seniors, much larger than Eminence’s graduating senior class of 33.

    While doing undergrad work at Western Kentucky University, she came home with a sorority sister from Henry County and attended a local wedding.