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Local News

  • Schools awarded for energy efficiency

    Henry County High School and New Castle Elementary recently were recognized as Energy Star rated facilities saving the school district thousands of dollars.

    Sherman Adams, the energy and systems manager for Trimble, Shelby and Henry County school districts and Anchorage Independent presented Henry County High School and New Castle Elementary with Energy Star plaques to commemorate the schools’ achievements and saving the district $28,216.

    Adams stressed in his report that changes in lifestyle must be paramount when it comes to energy management.

  • Magistrates make budget cut proposals

    One month after being asked to find $150,000 to $250,000 to trim out of the Henry County budget, the committee appointed to do so devised a series of proposals that could result in at least a $290,000 gain.

    Magistrate Nick Hawkins chaired the committee, and last week presented several proposals to the fiscal court.

    The bulk of the gain relies upon non-emergency EMS transports, to the tune of $150,000 to $300,000 per year.

  • Failure is key

     

     

    Andrew Shearer hopes to see his students fail. He considers it the key to their success.

    Shearer teaches the principles of engineering, woodworking, graphic art and physics with hands on problem solving to about 100 to 110 students at Henry County High School every year. For Shearer, teaching isn’t really why he loves his job.

  • CBurg to invest in firehouse repairs

    The city of Campbellsburg will, again, have to fork out some cash for the rebuilt Campbellsburg Fire Station.

    Campbellsburg Mayor Rex Morgan said during the city’s Monday night meeting that he asked an electrician to look into some ‘issues’ at the station. The request came as part of an attempt by the city to address a list of problems with the revamped station as provided by the Campbellsburg Volunteer Fire Department.

  • County to merge paid, volunteer EMS services

    In the beginning, Henry County EMS was strictly volunteer.

    Then, in the 1990s, the county switched to a paid EMS service, with the volunteers pitching in.

    That will soon change, as the volunteers will merge with the paid service, as announced last week during the regular meeting of the Henry County Fiscal Court.

  • Eminence designated as a ‘Diamond in the Rough’ by Bluegrass Institute

    Eminence Independent Schools has been recognized as a ‘diamond in the rough’ by a recent study.

    The Bluegrass Institute, a nonprofit organization, conducted a study to find out which school districts delivered the most educational bang for the taxpayer’s buck.

    The report derived a score spending index (SSI), a numerical value based on school achievement test scores weighed against per pupil spending in 2011.

    The SSI calculation starts with the school district’s average composite score from the ACT.

  • Get your caber on at Celtic Fest

    Brian King thrives on competition.

    Before donning kilts and tossing cabers, King played sports more familiar to most Americans.

    King played football at Shelby County High School and continued to play in college as a Kentucky Wesleyan College panther. King coached college football for two years.

    He needed a competitive release and started doing powerlifting.

  • Crash claims the life of Defoe man

    A well-known competitor in the horse-pulling world has died of injuries he received in a head-on traffic accident in Shelby County.

    Oscar David Ethington, 69, of Defoe  was killed Friday when the Ford pickup truck he was driving was struck by another driver who veered across the center line of Ky. 55, about two miles north of the intersection with the Shelbyville Bypass.

    The other driver, Susan Hughes, 42, of Sparta was taken to the University of Louisville with non-life-threatening injuries and later released.

  • A dose of Reality (Farms)

    Roy Jackson’s father dreamed he and his son could farm together.

    Jackson continues his father’s dream with his own son on Reality Farms near New Castle.

    Roy and Judy Jackson moved their farm from Delaware, Ohio, when urban sprawl started infringing on their farm and way of life. Their daughter Laura had married local attorney and farmer Keith Jeffries, and Henry County seemed like the place where they have both a family and a farm. Roy and Judy, both in their 60s, brought their son Matt with them.

  • Two eluding KSP in meth lab case

    A Pendleton woman and her son are missing and eluding law enforcement while family members face charges related to a meth lab bust.

    Mother Christina Walker, 37, and her son John Walker, 21, both have eluded arrest since the end of May.