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Local News

  • With closure, city will lose historic buildings

    Three more buildings along East Broadway may soon join the demolished history of Eminence’s past.

    Eminence City Council read the final ordinance last week to close the Browning’s Lane alley. Eminence Mayor Drane Stephens said all the property owners with butting access and easements along Browning Lane had to verbally agree to a consent to sell to CVS. According to Stephens, the remaining buildings would be cleared for construction.

  • 19th century lynch mob justice

    The Henry and Owen County and Kentucky River Marauders terrorized residents in Owen and Henry County for a reported 16 years before a lynch mob took justice into their own hands and four suspects from New Castle Jail.

  • 1837: 100 acres purchased for 6¢/acre

    200 Years Ago

    On Sept. 10, Jacob Admire posted a bond to secure a license to marry Sara Heaton, daughter of William Heaton.  The marriage ceremony, officiated by William Dawkins, was held on the same day.

    After posting a bond for a marriage license on Aug. 31,  Taliaferro Duncan wed Polly Smith on Sept. 3.  Isaac Malin, a Baptist Minister, performed the ceremony. 

    175 Years Ago

  • Magistrates to cut $150k from budget

    Henry County property taxes will not increase this year, but the magistrates who voted to leave property taxes flat will begin meeting to look at how they might slice a little more out of the county budget.

    “We had a good run of eight years in the black and built our funds up to over $2 million,” Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent told the magistrates last week. “Then we were down a little in 2011, but nothing that I think was too concerning… but last year, we had a tough year, down over $500,000.”

  • Animal shelter gets 501c3 status

    The Henry County Animal Shelter in collaboration with the Humane Society worked to make part of the shelter a nonprofit agency. The shelter and residents will soon offer more services at lower costs.

    Henry County Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt will sit down with Pam Rogers from the Humane Society to do the necessary paperwork for the shelter. With less than year into the new shelter, progress continues by unleashed leaps and bounds.

  • Beshear, Vilsack issue disaster declaration

    More than half of the nation’s farms continue to experience low yielding soybean and corn crops due to the drought.

    With approximately 116 of the state’s 120 counties classified as drought disaster areas, Henry County farmers are eligible to receive drought relief as a contiguous county to primary disaster designated counties following Governor Steve Beshear’s announcement last week that U.S. Agriculture Secrectary Tom Vilsack added more disaster areas.

  • A good thrashin’
  • Ag creates something from nothing for Davie

    Agriculture is creating something from almost nothing for Lindsey Davie and that is why it is one of the most important disciplines to study.

    Davie loves teaching not just in Henry County, but also across the world.

    She volunteered in Haiti as an agriculture missionary where she taught the local population about erosion control from deforestation, composting, livestock, and contour farming. This summer she went to Indonesia where farmers still use cattle to plow fields.  She did similar work in the Philippines and Trinidad.

  • Music a constant in Moss’ life

    Curtis Moss’ family always had music in their life.

    As the Eminence Independent Schools’ Music Director for middle and high school band, choir, brass quintet and general music educator he continues to instruct and instill the fundamentals and fun of music in his students.

  • You’re never too old to start anew

    Jeff Downey never let geography stand in the way of his creativity.

    From the little town of Bethlehem to the city of Angels, the Henry County native continues to surround his life with music and film.