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Local News

  • GED grads celebrate with Berry

    “It’s a tough road, but don’t give up... you’ll get where you need to go.”

    A tearful Amber Rosell shared those words with her Henry County Adult Education classmates Thursday night during the group’s graduation ceremony, which included a special guest.

  • Honoring the humble hankie

    Until the 1920s, they were used for everything from wiping away tears and wiping runny noses, to being transformed into dolls, or used as a signal to a prospective suitor.

    But in 1924, the Kleenex was born, and the humble handkerchief’s prominence began to fade.

    Last week, collectors of handkerchiefs and buttons gathered at Twin Oaks Nursing Center in New Castle to share their collections, and stories about the once popular accessory.

  • GOP, Dems pick jailer candidates

    After months of searching and interviewing, the Henry County Republican and Democratic Executive Committees have made their choices.

    Doug Kemp will represent the GOP and Scott Southworth will represent the Democrats in November in an election for Henry County Jailer.

    The position was vacated earlier this year after Republican Ronnie Stephens resigned from the post.

  • A family affair

    About halfway down a steep grade between Defoe and Frankfort in a snaking curve of U.S. 421, foot-stomping music rings out from the Six Mile Jamboree every Saturday night until the wee hours of the next morning.

    Dancers and revelers of all ages have filled the 256-seat-capacity venue to usher in 45 New Years in Henry County.

    Countless meals have been served, and hundreds of musicians have electrified audiences.

  • Court votes 4-2 to accept AOC offer

    The debate is over — Henry County will, by 2016, have a brand new or renovated and upgraded courthouse.

  • ‘Re-’ is the key for EIS

    In a July 28 open house, students and parents of Eminence Independent Schools will see a refurbished elementary school and gymnasium.
    EIS drafted a bid, which was sent to the state, for several aspects of the renovations, including demolition. That bid was accepted.

    Because of that and by investing a great deal of their own sweat equity, Superintendent Buddy Berry calculated their savings at about 40 percent.
    “We did over $80,000 of work ourselves,” he said. “When you have talented folks, it goes a long, long way.”

  • Brammell really ‘cuts the mustard’

    When a 21-year old hears the battle cry of “Road Trip!!!” there is only one thing to do: hop in the car with a buddy and start driving.

    Recently, newly graduated University of Kentucky senior Reese Brammell answered that siren call, but in a most unusual way.

    Brammell explained from on the road in Fargo, N.D. “I was looking for anything over-the-top fun, exciting and entertaining,” he said. “I Googled ‘fun things to do after graduation.’”

  • Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back.

    On Friday, June 24, Henry County’s Relay for Life teams gathered at Henry County High School to celebrate and remember cancer survivors and those whose lives were cut short by the disease. Above, survivors and their families take to the track for the first lap. At right, Suzanne Nelson and Terry Heffley work on Team Dunavan’s tent site — a Candyland theme. Below, Diana Berry places a photo of Marla Young during a ceremony honoring the former Relay for Life chairwoman.

  • Thumbs up to the lunch lady

    EIS students need only to give the lunch lady a thumbs-up this fall to receive their noon-time meals.

    New biometric technology in the cafeteria will read each child’s thumbprint to validate his or her identity.

    Superintendent Buddy Berry said the biggest advantage is that students can only access their own accounts. “Kids can’t type in another code,” he said. “Besides that, it’s just really cool.”

    Another plus is that parents may check how much money they have left in the child’s account online.

  • Becoming a Cancer Warrior

    In 2006 the National Cancer Institute cited Kentucky as having a higher than national average rate of death from cancer.   The primary reason cited was lung cancer death from smoking.  Inactivity, diet and excess weight are also to blame according to the American Cancer Society.

    Health advocates in Kentucky still have much work to do when it comes to persuading Kentuckians to adopt healthy lifestyle choices and gain better access to health care so that they can get diagnosed and treated.