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Local News

  • Shelby residents question outlet mall

    By Steve Doyle

    Landmark News Service

    Simpsonville City officials didn’t attend a community-wide briefing conducted last week by Horizon Group to present plans about its proposed outlet mall, so now a couple of concerned residents are taking their questions to the city.

  • Henry/Trimble Animal Shelter is open for business

    Project manager Tony Walker on Thursday received the certificate of occupancy for the new Henry and Trimble Animal Shelter, meaning the facility has passed all required inspections.

  • Fair once was a July 4 picnic

    In the early 1900s, the Henry County Fair then called the Henry County Homecoming and Fourth of July Picnic, boasted attendance records paling any event in the state aside from the Kentucky Derby.

    More than 100 years later, its original location and amusements have changed but it still draws families from across the county.

  • Walker meth case sent to grand jury

    During a hearing in Henry County District Court on Monday, Judge Diana E. Wheeler found enough evidence to move a case against sisters Amber and Sabrina Walker for a meth lab seized in their mother’s bedroom to the grand jury.

    On May 22, Kentucky State Police Trooper Mitch Hazelett went to the Walkers’ resident on 343 Wolfpen Branch Road to serve a warrant for the sisters’ mother, Christina Walker.

  • Judge finds dead birds behind door

    For Henry County Family Court Judge Tim Feely, a “disgusting” discovery of dead birds began when he fed his interest in and curiosity about architecture.

    One day during a break in court proceedings, Feely decided to check out the cupola that leads to the clock tower at the Henry County Courthouse. What he found stopped him in his tracks.

    “The steps (to the cupola) are covered in guano,” he said last week. “And, interestingly enough, there were two dead pigeons on the bottom step. I was like, that’s pretty disgusting.”

  • Fiscal Court adopts HB 273

    The Henry County Fiscal Court has done what the Kentucky General Assembly did not.

    Last week, the magistrates approved an amendment to the county’s “dog ordinance”  to include language from House Bill 273.

  • Scott indicted for trafficking in pot

    An Eminence woman charged after receiving 30 pounds of marijuana by UPS has been indicted.

    Sarah Scott, 30, was arrested in February after Henry County Sheriff Deputy Danny Stivers received a call from San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department stating that a K-9 unit detected two packages containing approximately 30 pounds of marijuana were to be shipped via UPS to a resident in Henry County. Stivers arranged for FedEx to ship the packages to the Henry County Sheriff’s Department office instead.

  • Gentle Giants

     

     

    Some people say Oscar Ethington’s fame as a draft horse champion comes from his hard training and expertise, but Ethington claims the lord blessed him and he knows it.

  • CVS looking at Eminence location

    According to Eminence Mayor Drane Stephens, CVS is looking at Eminence as a possible location for one of its stores.

    During Eminence’s last city council meeting, Tammy Sharp asked the council to dispel rumors by answering if CVS planned to put a store in Eminence.  Sharp, has been an employee at Cook’s Pharmacy and True Value Hardware for 17 years. She asked the council about the various rumors of CVS Pharmacy coming to Eminence with concern for the impact on the community and her coworkers.

  • The Amish: keeping life simple

    Amos and David Troyer’s family want to live the old fashioned way. Not because they are Amish, but because they want to keep life simple.

    Buggies frequently travel on U.S. 421 and along the back roadways in Henry County. They are just as much a part of our rural landscape as tractors and hay wagons. The Amish are often seen, but as a people are not always heard.