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Local News

  • Rural roots inspire modern soundscapes

     

    Gerald Plain weds his childhood life in rural Kentucky with modern classical composition.

    The winner of several fellowship awards, Plain scores his small town autobiography in his compositions.

  • USPS cutting hours

    Henry County residents can expect reduced hours at their local post offices by March with a reduction of hours in other locations.

    The cost cutting strategy will save the postal service what it hopes is an estimated half billion dollars annually.

    The U.S. Postal Service made a two-year strategy for reducing its lost revenue and financial instability by reducing hours across the nation.

    The U.S. Postal Service examined post offices throughout the county based on customer usage and have already had town meetings about the reduction.

  • Eminence and bank ‘grew up together’

    In 1967, John Heady, chairman of the Farmer’s Deposit Bank, wrote in a 100th year anniversary booklet that the bank and Eminence had grown up together.

    The building, which still stands on land given as a gift in 1871 by the Moody Hotel owners, will be demolished by the end of February as part of a development and new growth for the CVS pharmacy in Eminence.

  • Local named among the state’s best mid-sized weeklies

    Friday night, the Henry County Local was named as one of the top mid-sized weeklies in the state by the Kentucky Press Association.

    During the organizations Excellence in Kentucky Newspapers 2012 contest, the Local won 15 individual awards. The combined awards earned the paper 2nd place General Excellence in the mid-sized weekly division.

    Individual awards were:

    Brad Bowman

    First place General News for his story titled Small Voices, about child sexual abuse.

    Second place Best Business/Agribusiness story.

  • Thousands of acres... all for you

    A hike in the outdoors can prove therapeutic even during the winter months when one needs to ward off the weariness of cabin fever.

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources owns and manages about 2,629 acres along the Kentucky River in Henry and Owen Counties where residents can do precisely that.

    On Kentucky 561 outside of Orville near Gest, a tract of the wildlife management area open to the public offers a hiking trail with a pond and an open field where dove hunts and other department activities are free for the public.

  • Bartlett remains may be in Canada

    Two Kentucky war veterans may finally come home after 200 years.

    Canadian archeologists discovered two anomalies in Tecumseh Park in Chatham-Kent, Ontario, indicative of grave shafts.

    According to research done by a historian from the Kentucky National Guard, one of those proposed graves might contain the remains of Henry Countian Pvt. Foster Bartlett, who enlisted in the Kentucky Mounted Infantry and never returned home.

  • FDs request deed fee increase

    Henry County fire departments operate on budgets based on the price of equipment from seven years ago.

    Fire department officials from each county station met with magistrates Saturday in an effort to strategize a way to increase deed feeds and maintain compliance with safety regulations.

    “I guess from my point of view we need more money,” said Scott Bates, magistrate for District 1. “I honestly don’t know how we can sell a tax increase during these tough times. Everyone is scraping by.”

  • Airbag deploys in parked van

    Tommy Lanham, minister at New Castle Christian Church, had just parked the family’s 2003 Dodge Caravan in his driveway before he heard what he thought was an explosion.

    “I don’t think I had even one foot down on the driveway,” Lanham said. “I was in the process of getting out of the van and had my back to the passenger side when I heard the explosion. I actually looked to the front of the van to see what happened. Then I noticed the air bag on the passenger side had gone off.”

  • Local men recall King march

    It took two years after a Civil Rights march on Frankfort in 1964 to end segregation in the Commonwealth’s businesses and job force, but King’s speech, a version of the “I Have a Dream” speech,  inspired some Henry County residents for a lifetime.

  • Helping Hands

    Joan Lacey once told Henry County Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt she wished she could meet one decent person in this world who truly loves animals.

    He handed her a mirror.

    Every other week, the Pleasureville resident loads up animals at the Henry County Animal Shelter and takes them to Bullitt County. There, the crated dogs — an average total of 60 to 80 per week from three counties — are placed on a transport that will take them six hours north to Chicago.

    Every six weeks, Lacey drives that transport to the Windy City.