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Local News

  • Officials inspect Madison-Milton bridge after 911 calls

    By Dave Taylor

     

    An investigation is under way following a series of calls received by the 911 emergency system in Madison, Ind., that led to the closure of the Milton-Madison Bridge on Friday night.

    Jefferson County, Ind., Sheriff John Wallace said he has asked the Indiana Department of Homeland Security for its assistance in the investigation.

  • Splash down

    Four years after a project to revamp the Eminence Pool was halted, a water-feature may soon be part of Coach D Park.

    Last week, the Eminency City Council voted to apply for a Land and Water grant that would help fund a water recreational area at the park as part of the Eminence City Park renovations project proposal.

    The resolution passed unanimously as the application’s deadline was April 30.

  • Suspect in Oldham killings arrested in N.C.

     

    By Jacquelin Stoess-Hack

    Landmark News Service

    A Westport man who claims he shot two women in self-defense a week before Christmas is now charged with the sisters’ murder.

    An Oldham County grand jury indicted Ronald T. “Ronnie” Evridge on May 3. After police searched for him for several days, he was arrested early Friday morning.

  • “Hi Helen” history rooted in World War II era Austria


    In Port Royal, the words “Hi Helen!!! IFW” have hung on a barn for more than 30 years.
    The origins of this story began about 67 years ago, not in Henry County, but Austria.
    According to Joe Winterberg, his father Ignace Fenlon Winterberg of Ludlow was an enlisted member of the 42nd Rainbow Division during World War II. He was a supply sergeant who did more than just receive supplies or procure them for his unit.

  • Conservation district cost share program announced

    The Henry County Conservation District will accept requests for cost share funding under the Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share and Environmental Stewardship Program from May 14 to June 15.

    The two programs were created to help agricultural operations protect soil and water, and were established by the Kentucky General Assembly in the 1994 and 2000. Over 17 years, about $120 million has been approved to plan, design and install best management practices on about 14,200 farms to protect soil resources and water quality.

  • EIS unveils partnership with Bellarmine University

    Tuesday morning, Eminence Independent Schools revealed a project they said was two years in the making.

    Eminence High School juniors and seniors will soon have the opportunity to take college courses at Bellarmine University for free.

    Juniors and seniors with qualifying ACT scores in math, English, reading and science can earn a dual high school and college credit while attending classes at Bellarmine’s campus.

  • ‘30 ft. is my living room’

    Twenty years ago, Paula and Brad Crawford talked about how one day the road in front of their home would need to be rebuilt.

    The couple both worked with the EMS in New Castle and knew a change was needed.

    “I have seen many wrecks. We knew Henry County was growing and with traffic coming from out of Oldham County traffic was going to get busier,” Crawford said.

    It’s going to be hard for Paula Crawford to let go of the house her and her late husband Crawford built in 1981.

  • Fiscal Court considers $5.8m budget

    With a few relatively minor changes, the Henry County Fiscal Court has approved the first reading of the 2012-2013 county budget.

    One key change for the county will be a continuing decline in revenue for EMS.

    Henry County Judge Executive John Logan Brent told the court that EMS revenue is down about $250,000 from where it was in the past. Three years ago, he said, revenue was over $600,000 just for EMS, thanks primarily to non-emergency transports.

    As the economy worsened, the number of those transports dropped.

  • Lack of manpower key in N.C. ordinance

    As the mercury rises, so does the need to do lawn care and enforce city ordinances for those that don’t.
    In April, the New Castle City Commission held first reading of an ordinance creating a citation officer position during its last meeting to enforce such city ordinances. As the commission looks into the position, it also will consider solutions from other cities.

  • Home, ‘Sweet Home’


    Defoe, once known as ‘Sweet Home,’ had four grocery stores, a post office and two blacksmith shops.
    The idyllic town was formed on part of the Low Dutch Tract originally purchased by Dutch settlers looking to preserve their language, culture and religion without English influence.
    The town’s legacy has been recorded much like family history:  with personal recollections and affection. Three sources, two from the past and one from the present gave insight into a town left behind in the path of modern progress.