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Local News

  • From my grill to yours — the perfect steak

    Cooking engages our most primal instincts.

    The elaborate dance of flame and smoke with glowing coals incites memories of family cookouts, holidays and seasonal nostalgia.

    In my 15 years of working as a professional chef, writing too many menus and standing on my feet for long hours, I never lost the joy from creating and cooking.

  • Shaking with the Shakers

    The Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill offers a retreat in time to 19th century living and a scenic landscape to clear one’s head.

    The village has more than 3,000 acres with 34 Shaker buildings, which stand as museum exhibits, overnight lodging for the inn, a restaurant, crafts and gift shops, with barns and corn cribs that are still in use.

    The private nonprofit foundation at Shaker Village continues to preserve and protect the village grounds and offers 40 miles of hiking trails with 1,000 acres of restored native prairie grasses and wildflowers.

  • Peace and quiet?

    When Kathy Jacobs and her husband moved to Henry County 16 years ago, they found the quiet and tranquility they’d been looking for.

    “I like it here, and I’m not going back north,” she told the Henry County Fiscal Court on July 16. But along Blueridge Road near Valley View Landfill, something has been disturbing that peace and tranquility.

  • McClamroch retires after 34 years

    Donna McClamroch always knew she wanted to be a teacher.

    As a child, she loved playing school. When she grew into an adult, she brought that love for teaching to Eminence 34 years ago.

    McClamroch graduated from Valley Station High School in Louisville — a school with an average of 400 seniors, much larger than Eminence’s graduating senior class of 33.

    While doing undergrad work at Western Kentucky University, she came home with a sorority sister from Henry County and attended a local wedding.

  • Take 5 with Connie Scriber

    By Brad Bowman

    Bio

    Henry County Native

    1966 Eminence Graduate

    Past owner of Lola’s and Standard Oil Station.

     

    Tell me about your band The Misfits.

  • New biz for C’Burg

    Henry County residents can expect a new pharmacy in Campbellsburg by mid August or early September.

    The family owned and operated pharmacy Bluegrass Drug Center wants to be your neighbor and your pharmacy. Tom Beringer opened his own store in Covington in 1979, but moved his business to Warsaw in 1995. Beringer opened a pharmacy in Bedford in 2011 and plans to bring the small town, personal service to Campbellsburg.

  • A working dog’s life

    Adriana Plum wants everyone to have fun including her animals.

    Plum will bring her working Australian Shepherds and ducks to the Harvest Showcase Saturday for herding and agility demonstrations.

    Plum started training Certik, her Australian Shepherd, 10 years ago. Four championship titles later as the Most Versatile Aussie by the Australian Shepherd Club of America, Certik and Plum enjoy the tranquility of their Jackson Road farm.

  • One Tank Trip: Henry Clay’s Ashland

    Henry Clay’s house Ashland stands as a bridge between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War.

    As a child, Clay witnessed British soldiers raid his house and grew up in slaveholding Hanover County, W.Va., in the same county as Patrick Henry where Henry County gets its name.

    County residents can reach Ashland in an hour. It is 60 miles from Eminence to Lexington and takes less than half a tank of gas.

  • Take 5 with Maryellen Garrison

    Basic bio

    Originally born in Groesbeck, Ohio near Cincinnati.

    Graduate of University of Cincinnati, 1971.  Graduated on a Sunday and started working for the extension on a Monday 42 years ago. Degree in nutrition and dietetics.

    Why did you major in Nutrition and Dietetics?

    I started in American History it was called American Studies as a major. The only job opportunities was like in an ambassador’s office and it sounded like nothing I would be suited for.

  • Dirty business lets you get your Mud Madness on

    Bryan Snider saw something that could be successful when he opened Mud Madness on his relatives’ land.

    Snider revamped a business idea in eastern Henry County that is garnering attention from riding clubs in Louisville, Indiana and Cincinnati.

    With a sound business policy and 600 acres of trails full of switchbacks and inclines, Snider hopes his business will be something the entire county can be proud of and enjoy.