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Local News

  • Martin indicted for a 3rd time

    A Turners Station man facing charges related to having sex with a minor will face additional charges.

    Joseph David Martin, 39, of Turners Station was indicted in March for complicity to tampering with a witness and complicity to tampering with physical evidence, both Class D felonies.

  • AC fire closes EIS for a day

    Eminence Independent School students had an early day as officials shut down the school on Monday morning due to a non-injury fire in the gymnasium lobby.

    Emergency 911 Dispatch received a call at 9:42 a.m. that the school had a fire in the gymnasium lobby. Eminence Fire Chief Gary Lucas said damage was minimized.

  • Project would expand sewer capacity

    It took several years of planning, saving and jumping through grant hoops, but a project to increase Eminence’s sewer capacity by 250,000 gallons per day is holding water.

    The project would increase capacity at Eminence’s treatment plant from 500,000 gallons to 750,000 gallons per day capacity, and may finally be coming down the pipeline.

  • The Resettling of America

    The Berry Center’s conference laid the framework for a pragmatic homecoming and resettling of rural America with heavyweights in backgrounds from academics, activism, agriculture and theology.

    The center’s conference — “From Unsettling to Resettling: What Will it Take to Resettle America” — Friday at Louisville’s Brown Hotel emphasized the global need for solutions to industrial scale farming, responsible land stewardship and how destructive agricultural practices impact food production, resources and communities on a global scale.

  • Berry wants to move past the Unsettling of America

    Henry County native writer, philosopher, farmer and activist Wendell Berry wants to move past his book.

    Berry’s book, “The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture” celebrates its 36-year anniversary this year.

    In the book, Berry delivers discourse on the hijacking of farming from a family culture into the insatiable appetite of large scale farming production. Berry renders the beginnings of conquest in the ‘New World’ with historical threads of alienation from the land in a seam calling for sensible land stewardship.

  • EIS earns Magna Award for FIRE model

    The American School Board Journal awarded Eminence Independent Schools with a first place national award for its School on FIRE (Framework of Innovation for Reinventing Education) program.

    Eminence Independent Schools received a first place award in the 19th annual Magna Awards program sponsored by the National School Boards Association’s American School Board Journal. The Magna Awards program, supported by Sodexo, selected 15 first place and 15 honorable mention winners based on enrollment size.

  • GA passes hemp pension bills

     The General Assembly finished out the 2013 legislative session by tackling the public pension problem and passing a framework bill for industrial hemp in the late hours of Tuesday.

  • America’s pastime in Eminence

    Appropriately in the wake of opening day at professional baseball clubs across the nation, Howard Byers may be among the last generation to remember the Bluegrass League baseball games at the Oddfellows Park in Eminence.

    Byers fondly remembered Sunday afternoons and the ‘Fourth of July’ as child relishing America’s greatest pastime, baseball.

  • Cook’s to close by end of year

    Cook’s, a Henry County institution since 1964, will close its three pharmacies when CVS Pharmacy opens later this year in Eminence.

    Roger Cook opened the pharmacy, which would celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2014, first in Eminence and also had a toy store on the corner across from city hall in the 1970s. By the 1980s, Cook had built the present Eminence store site and combined the pharmacy with a retail store that offered hardware supplies.

    Current co-owner George McDannold said the decision to sell to CVS is bittersweet.

  • Putting education in the students’ hands

    Campbellsburg Elementary has put the education of its fourth grade class into its students’ hands.

    Mark Johnson, Campbellsburg Elementary principal, called the fourth grade classes into the cafeteria on Wednesday and told them they had not performed well as a grade on certain areas of a test. Johnson kept a stern face, wheeled a cart in front of the students and revealed that it was stocked with Google’s Chromebooks.