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Local News

  • Comer: Hemp is not controversial

    Ag in Kentucky is economic development.

    That’s Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer’s position.

    “Ag is the perfect industry to look at as we plan for the next 20 years of economic development in Kentucky,” he said during the annual Rotary-Farm-City lunch Monday.

  • A quick snow shower

    Parts of Central Kentucky were hit with a brief snow storm Sunday afternoon. A snowy scene from a farm on Bethlehem Road.
    Kentucky State Police worked 19 noninjury accidents Sunday, including one on U.S. 421 north of New Castle and three injury accidents.
    By Tuesday, most of the snow had melted.

  • Take 5

    Basic bio

    Loyal Pittsburgh Steelers fan since the 1970s.

    Campbellsburg Elementary Principal for nine years.

    Played football, basketball, baseball and track in High School.

    EKU bachelor’s in physical education and health.

    Georgetown University for master’s in secondary education.

    EKU Rank 1 for principal.

    Johnson’s dad also served as a principal of Sulphur and Campbellsburg Elementary.

     

    Tell me about your evolution of dance video on YouTube?

  • A work in progress

    Bobby and Janet King want to bring the past to the present.

    The couple purchased the Main Street building in New Castle where the Tumble Time studio was located in December as a present to each other. The Kings  renovated the upstairs 1,100 sq. ft. apartment to its former 19th century splendor along with modern amenities that could compete with any downtown Louisville loft. Janet King said this is just stage one.

  • Residents speak against demolition

    City residents attended, a tense yet civil, Eminence City Council meeting with concerns of preservation and progress in their town.

    Eric Whisman, education and outreach coordinator for Preservation Kentucky, and Lance Minnis, Eminence resident and financial advisor, asked the council to request a 90-day stay of demolition for the Eminence Deposit Bank and the former Kings Auto Parts buildings that are on the National Historic Registry.

  • Sholar has a passion for people

     

    Clyde Sholar had an appreciation for people and a desire to care for them at an early age. His passion grew into numerous professions doing the same.

    Most residents in Henry County know Sholar as co-owner of the funeral home in Pleasureville, but last year he retired from the National Guard and United States Geological Survey as an emeritus scientist with honors commemorating his work as a pioneer in safety protocol.

  • Massie touts bills, blasts House

    The Henry County GOP had a packed house Saturday evening for their Lincoln-Reagan dinner.

    “Last year we had 75 people,” chairman Jon Park said. “I think we broke that tonight.”

    The tables were indeed packed with at least 100 attendees as the GOP heard from Congressman Thomas Massie (R-Ky. 4), State Senator Paul Hornback and others.

  • Henry County’s link to the Fugitive Slave Act

    Under a waxing moon on what likely was a warm night on Saturday, Aug. 5, 1843, a family of six slaves was spirited across the Ohio River from a plantation in Hunters Bottom in Carroll County to Jefferson County, Ind., where they began a treacherous journey to freedom – and an important place in U.S. history.

  • P’ton sewers possible

    A plan is in the works to bring sewer access to Pendleton.

    The plan is in its infancy, and depending on funding sources may be years away from becoming more than a dream.

    The plan would bring sewer access to Pendleton’s businesses from La Grange. District 1 Magistrate Roger Hartlage and others, including Harold Bratton, hatched the idea at a Cracker Barrel.

    The idea is simple: an 8-inch gravity feed line to a pump station in Pendleton, then a 4-inch forced main to La Grange.

  • Park & play at county parks

    Despite a mild winter, county residents can remedy the need to get outdoors and quell the seasonable cabin fever by visiting one of the county parks.

    Both Harry Hill and the Henry County Recreation and Service Park offer exercise and recreation for families, individuals and public leagues,some year round.

    Travis Buchanan, Henry County Parks Coordinator, said the park sees activity even when temperatures reach low digits.