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Local News

  • 5 years later

    Staff writer/photographer

    O n Wednesday, May 26, 2004, the headlines reflected life as normal in Henry County. New Castle wasn’t yet raising water rates, it wasn’t your daddy’s football, and one city was considering a bicycle patrol.

    A page of photos touting the revival of Eminence Day depicted smiling residents waving from from a convertible, barbecuing and gliding down a slide barefooted. The page proclaimed“Eminence Day 2004 hit town on Saturday, May 22.”

    What a difference a day makes.

  • Tractor ride raises $500 for Relay

    Staff writer/photographer

    William Potts, organizer of the Second Annual Henry County Tractor Drive hoped for a large turnout.

    “We had 35 entries last year,” he said. “This year I’d like to see 100.”

    By noon on Saturday a half-dozen had made their way to the Henry County fairgrounds for a 27 mile drive to raise money and awareness for the Relay for Life.

    “It’s just a bunch of guys who are going to tour Henry County and raise some money,” Potts said.

  • Who is Warren Stone?

    General Manager

    On May 18, Warren Stone sat quietly in the jury box of the Henry County District courtroom, shifting his hands and periodically surveying the scene around him.

    Handcuffed and in the orange jumpsuit of the Carroll County Detention Center, Stone chatted with the jailers responsible for bringing him to court, and later with his attorney, Ben Coomes.

  • RELAY For Life

    Relay For Life in Henry County is quickly approaching, scheduled for Friday, June 26, at the Henry County High School Track.  Relay For Life is the American Cancer Society’s signature activity. It offers everyone in a community an opportunity to participate in the fight against cancer. Teams of people camp out at a local high school, park, or fairground and take turns walking or running around a track or path. Each team is asked to have a representative on the track at all times during the event. Relays are an overnight event, up to 24 hours in length.

     

  • HCPS presents ‘good’ budget

    Staff writer/photographer

    At the May meeting of the HCPS board, superintendent Tim Abrams asked the board to approve the 2009-10 district tentative budget.

    “It’s a good budget,” he said. “It shows us being in sound financial condition.”

    Abrams said it is difficult to call it a great budget because although the district has a six percent contingency, future cuts at the state level could deplete the fund significantly. The district is required to maintain a reserve of at least two percent.

  • EIS to install new softball backstop

    Staff writer/photographer

    Emma Foree has lived  on Crabb Ave. across from the Eminence Independent Schools’ softball field for four years.

    During games she has come to expect fouled-back softballs landing in her yard or closer.

    Last year during tournament play a ball flew through an open window.

    “That’s something I can’t explain to this day,” she said. “The ball landed right on my son’s bed.”

  • Nineteen teams made up of 85 Henry County Biggest Losers are off to a great start! If you’d still like to join, call 220-3614. Achieve maximum weight loss for your team by encouraging your teammates and holding one another seriously accountable for the next nine weeks. No secrets are hidden from the scales!

  • Smithfield Baptist Church is razed

    Staff writer/photographer

    For 137 years, the oldest portion of Smithfield Baptist Church stood tall. It stands no more.

    Reverend Ed Life said the old building finally had to come down.

    The sign outside the church reads “Thank you, Lord, for 137 years in this building.”

  • Three EHS, two HCHS students named as Governors Scholars

    Staff writer/photographer

    Five students in Henry County have been selected to participate in the 2009 Governors Scholars Program.

    Three Eminence High School juniors and two from Henry County High School (plus an alternate) recently were chosen for the program.

    EHS students Keisha Jamison and Rachel Sims look forward to participating in the project following a difficult application process.

  • Stuck in line? Not for long

    General Manager

    Motorists sitting in long lines on U.S. 421 soon will see some relief.

    Thanks to a set of perfect circumstances, turn lanes will be installed in front of the schools.

    Construction on two turn lanes — one into each entrance to the schools — is slated for this summer.

    Henry County Public Schools Superintendent Tim Abrams said he was excited about the project, which is something the district has sought for several years.