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Local News

  • Local officials share their New Year’s resolutions

    New Year’s resolutions come and go, and with area residents sure to make a few of their own, we checked with a few local officials to see if they had any resolutions for the coming year.

     

    “Try to spend a little more time with my family and grandchildren.”

    -- Henry County Clerk Juanita Lashley

     

    “I have made resolutions like walking on the treadmill and it lasted for two days. I’m not a fan of New Year’s resolutions, but I am a fan of setting annual goals.

  • Amputation case could go to state supreme court

    by

    Lisa King

    Landmark news service

     

    A Waddy man who lost a battle in the state Court of Appeals on Dec. 21 may not be giving up his fight to have his doctor held accountable for amputating his penis.

    The attorney for Phillip Seaton said Wednesday that he may go to the Kentucky Supreme Court, if necessary, to seek relief against Dr. John Patterson of Frankfort, who twice has been vindicated for deciding to amputate Seatons’ penis during a circumcision in 2007.

  • KSP seek help with unsolved cases

    The Kentucky State Police are renewing their effort to solve unsolved cases by asking the public for assistance with leads.  In 2010, KSP distributed more than 8,000 decks of playing cards to prisons across Kentucky depicting unsolved case information.

    The deck of cards highlighted 52 unsolved Kentucky homicide or missing person cases.  Since that time, three of those cases have been solved.

    KSP hopes that sharing information with the public again will provide fresh leads that can help solve these cases and bring some closure to families.

  • Smith files suits against County

    Terri Smith — the Henry County woman accused in December 2011 of more than 200 counts of animal cruelty — has filed two lawsuits against the county and Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt.

    Smith is suing the county for the wrongful death of her husband, Kenneth, as well as what the suit claims was the county’s failure to sell Smith’s animals at fair market value, intentional infliction of emotional distress, harassment and unwarranted humiliation.

  • EHS students go to the school of rock

    Three Eminence High School freshmen and Curtis Moss, Eminence Independent Schools’ Music Director have turned music class into a rock band.

    Travis Fahey, Jay Monroe and Meagan Riley play traditional band instruments for the first 45 minutes of band class. The three students and Moss set aside another hour for dueling distorted Les Paul guitars accompanied by Riley’s belting vocals for school supervised sonic goodness.

    The ultimate goal for the band, so far unnamed, is to make a show out of it.

  • Ready to roll for snow

     State and county road crews ready salt trucks for the county’s more than 400 miles of roadways in anticipation of the winter storm season.

    At press time, Henry County’s forecast included rain and a 40 percent chance of snow with light accumulation in parts of the county Friday. Before dawn Friday morning, rain turned to snow, and on some roads, rested on patches of ice.

  • Schools reexamine safety

    Local school superintendents and law enforcement agencies at the city, county and state level say the tragedy in Connecticut will improve the security of local schools with continued coordination and collaboration between all agencies.

  • Activity points toward CVS arrival

    Recent activity in Eminence indicates the arrival of a CVS store will happen possibly in 2013.

    On Dec. 10, Mayor Drane Stephens announced at Eminence City Council new businesses have opened on Eminence’s Main Street based on what is happening across the street.

    “A new toy store is opening, the Hispanic people will reopen the clothing store instead of focusing on their store in Owenton and a new resident has opened a pet store,” Stephens said. “Because things are happening across the street.”

  • To 5th grader kindness matters

    What the world needs now, Kylie Jo Turner says, is a little more kindness.

    While a 3rd grade student in Mercer County, Kylie watched the Rachel’s Challenge story.

    Rachel’s Challenge is the story of Rachel Scott, the first victim in the Columbine High School shooting in 1999. Prior to her death, Scott made it a point to be kind to others, and encouraged people around her to do the same.

    The story has been presented to students throughout the nation, and was presented in Eminence and Henry County schools last year.

  • 18-year-old sentenced to 11.5 years

    Staff

    An 18-year-old former Henry County resident will be sentenced to 11.5 years in prison after accepting a plea agreement last week in Henry County Circuit Court.

    The sentencing for Cody Russo, of Crestwood, was passed to Jan. 10, while a presentencing investigation is completed.