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Local News

  • Mother charged with forgery

    A Richmond woman is facing charges that she forged checks written against her own son’s bank account.

    Lori Leigh Neville, 37, is charged with 11 counts of 2nd degree possession of a forged instrument. She is charged with using her son Jacoby Moore’s checks to get cash at several Eminence businesses.

  • No such thing as a routine stop

    If there’s one thing every participant in the 2010 edition of the Kentucky State Police Citizen’s Police Academy learned, it’s simple: there is no such thing as a routine traffic stop.

    A highlight for many participants was taking part in a mock traffic stop, where they learned the reality of that statement. Each participant stepped into the role of trooper in the mock scenario, and learned just how quickly an ordinary stop can turn deadly.

  • Computer Hawks soars into Eminence

    A New Castle business is expanding to Eminence. On Jan. 1, Computer Hawks opened its doors on Depot Avenue.

    The business specializes in all things technical, from computer repair and virus removal, to laying the wire infrastructure for networking to building computers from the ground up, and more.

    Owner George Banks has operated the New Castle location since September 2009, and said business has gone so well, he had to open a second store in Eminence.

  • Rucker takes over as P&Z administrator

    Jody Rucker replaced former Planning & Zoning Administrator/Solid Waste Coordinator Greg Derosset on Dec. 8.

    The 43-year old was born and raised in Eminence and now lives in Pleasureville with wife Melinda, daughter Madison, 14, and son Jeremy, 10.

    He graduated from Eastern Kentucky University as a real estate major with a degree in business.

  • The best presents aren’t under the tree

    It’s been awhile since I was able to spend Christmas with both parents and my siblings.

    Since coming to Henry County we’ve been deterred by weather and ill-timed car problems.

    You see, it’s about a four-hour drive to get to my dad’s home in Western Kentucky — there’s no direct route, and the path is easily made treacherous by the slightest amount of snow.

    Mom’s place is only about 2.5 hours away, a much easier trek, mostly by interstate.

  • F.D. audit law revised

    An ordinance that will require Henry County’s fire departments to produce annual budgets and audits took a step closer to becoming law last week.
    Members of the Henry County Fiscal Court recently met with the county’s fire chiefs, and amended the original version of the ordinance to a more palatable version.

    Magistrates Jerry Beasley, Guy Coombs and Nick  Hawkins met with the chiefs in an effort to see “how we could better reflect what they’re already doing,” Hawkins said.

  • Be careful, he might go Beowulf on you

    For one fan of English literature and history, Henry County is home.
    Dr. William Pollard, a 1964 HCHS graduate, is vice-president and college dean at Transylvania University, where he also is a professor of English.
    Pollard has published books on medieval English literature and co-edited two works on medieval English mysticism and spirituality.

  • Oh, Little Town of Bethlehem

    The living Nativity in Bethlehem was populated by community members last week. At right, Sarah Baxter gets her wings. bottom Right, long-time friends Nick Suter, Olivia Herrell and Hallie Boyer took part in the nativity scene. At bottom left, Baxter and Wiseman Anthony Palmer don gloves and boots to face the frigid temperatures on 12/22.

  • Citizens Police Academy offers glimpse into Troopers’ job, daily lives

    Part 1 of a series

    Ever wonder what it’s like to know what the Kentucky State Police do every day and just exactly how they do it?
    Thanks to an initiative by KSP Commissioner Rodney Brewer, ordinary folks like me can participate in the Citizens Police Academy. The academy is a series of classes spread over 12 weeks and designed to give participants a better look at the what, why and how of the Kentucky State Police.

  • BIRTH: Bailey Elaine Satterly

    Bailey Elaine Satterly

    Nathan and Brittney Satterly of Campbellsburg announce the birth of their daughter, Bailey Elaine Satterly born Monday, December 20, 2010, at Baptist Northeast Hospital. She weighed 7 pounds 1 ounce and was 19 ¾ inches long.
    Grandparents are Teresa Tillet and Terry Satterly of New Castle; James E. Nutgrass, Bedford; and JoAnn McQueary, Milton.

    Great-grandparents are Elaine and Gayle Payne of Pleasureville and Joyce and James D. Nutgrass of Campbellsburg.