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Local News

  • Eminence designated as a ‘Diamond in the Rough’ by Bluegrass Institute

    Eminence Independent Schools has been recognized as a ‘diamond in the rough’ by a recent study.

    The Bluegrass Institute, a nonprofit organization, conducted a study to find out which school districts delivered the most educational bang for the taxpayer’s buck.

    The report derived a score spending index (SSI), a numerical value based on school achievement test scores weighed against per pupil spending in 2011.

    The SSI calculation starts with the school district’s average composite score from the ACT.

  • Get your caber on at Celtic Fest

    Brian King thrives on competition.

    Before donning kilts and tossing cabers, King played sports more familiar to most Americans.

    King played football at Shelby County High School and continued to play in college as a Kentucky Wesleyan College panther. King coached college football for two years.

    He needed a competitive release and started doing powerlifting.

  • Crash claims the life of Defoe man

    A well-known competitor in the horse-pulling world has died of injuries he received in a head-on traffic accident in Shelby County.

    Oscar David Ethington, 69, of Defoe  was killed Friday when the Ford pickup truck he was driving was struck by another driver who veered across the center line of Ky. 55, about two miles north of the intersection with the Shelbyville Bypass.

    The other driver, Susan Hughes, 42, of Sparta was taken to the University of Louisville with non-life-threatening injuries and later released.

  • A dose of Reality (Farms)

    Roy Jackson’s father dreamed he and his son could farm together.

    Jackson continues his father’s dream with his own son on Reality Farms near New Castle.

    Roy and Judy Jackson moved their farm from Delaware, Ohio, when urban sprawl started infringing on their farm and way of life. Their daughter Laura had married local attorney and farmer Keith Jeffries, and Henry County seemed like the place where they have both a family and a farm. Roy and Judy, both in their 60s, brought their son Matt with them.

  • Two eluding KSP in meth lab case

    A Pendleton woman and her son are missing and eluding law enforcement while family members face charges related to a meth lab bust.

    Mother Christina Walker, 37, and her son John Walker, 21, both have eluded arrest since the end of May.

  • The curing season

    In the wake of the summer drought, local tobacco farmers remain optimistic.

    While soybean yields are down and corn crops continue to be counted as a loss, tobacco looks better than it did the previous year for local farmers like Dean Clubb.

    “You won’t know till you put it on the scale,” Clubb said. “For quality tobacco it needs to get cured right, but it has remained remarkable given the drought.”

  • The Music Man

    Playing music is different than just listening to it for Chip Anderson. He hopes his teaching makes the same difference for his students.

    Anderson exposes Henry County middle and high school students to a broad spectrum of music from the classical to the contemporary. From Mozart to Cee Lo Green, students learn to play a variety of music that is entertaining and educational not just in the classroom, but at ballgames. His passion for music led to his job as Henry County middle and high school band director.

  • Fowler arraigned

    James E.  Fowler, 57, of Smithfield was arraigned Wednesday, Sept. 5 on charges that he murdered Nick Bibelhauser.

    He pled not guilty and was appointed a public defender and preliminary hearing is scheduled for Friday.

    According to reports from the detectives, Fowler said he was in the driver’s seat of his wife’s truck when Bibelhauser put a gun to his head.

  • The radio days: WSTL in Eminence


    J. Woodruff Dunavent loved building things.
    He built the Eminence radio station WSTL in 1956 and its actual air date was June 1.
    Dunavent built another radio station in St. Matthews WSTM in 1966.
    He and his wife Helen were progressive for the mid fifties.

  • Nationally renowned band has local roots

    Johnny Quaid never set out to be anything but honest with his music and his work.

    On his grandparent’s farm in Shelbyville where corn, silage and soybeans grew, so did Johnny and his cousin Jim’s band My Morning Jacket. Comprised of members from Pleasureville, Buckner, and Shelbyville the band’s music reached international acclaim with its first albums recorded mostly on the family farm.