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Local News

  • Have A Heart For Art

    With just 12 chances to display its students artwork, the Eminence Independent Schools annual calendar can only scratch the surface of creativity in the district.

    But on May 3, a spring art and music show at EIS will highlight works from throughout the year and represent every grade. The event begins at 5 p.m.

    This year’s celebration will include a middle and high school Art Club Auction.

    Art teacher and club sponsor Robin McHone instructed her middle and high school members to craft “useful pieces” for the event, mainly vases.

  • Lea’s legacy lives on

    A quarter-century ago, Campbellsburg Elementary School lost more than just a lunch lady.

    During her time at the school, Judy Lea developed a reputation not just for feeding the school’s children, but also providing for those children who were less fortunate.

  • Stem cells give a new leash on life

    Millions of Americans suffer from it. And so do millions of domestic animals.

    Last week, the Henry County Animal Clinic tried a new procedure to treat arthritis — stem cell therapy.

    On Friday, April 8, Mongo, an 8-year-old Australian Shepherd, got a high powered dose of his own stem cells to treat arthritis in his rear knees.

  • Local History

    April 1951
    T-Sgt. Walter Payton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Payton, Campbellsburg, has been reported missing by the War Department. He was a member of the crew of a B-29 which has been missing on a flight over Spain. No report has been received of the crew or plane in three weeks.

  • Years ago in Henry County

    Hammer Smith

    200 Years Ago
    On April 6, 1811, Jacob Walker of Henry County purchased 100 acres of Henry County land from George Wilson of Bourbon County for $250. Also on this date, George Wilson of Bourbon County sold 100 acres of land in Henry County to John Raden of Shelby County for $300.
    John Stratton and Rosanna Strate were married on April 18, 1811, by Lawrence Owen, a minister of the gospel.  Robert Dean co-signed  the bond of 50 pounds with Mr. Stratton.

  • Local History

    Submitted by Eleanor Sharp

  • Cleaning up the dam

    Alyssa Mattingly likes the scenery on the Little Kentucky River at the Sulphur Dam.

    The 17-year old HCHS senior likes it so much she decided to have some of her senior photos taken there.

    “I had gone to the Sulphur Dam the past two summers,” she said, “to swim down there.”
    But, when she arrived to have her picture taken, what she saw was not scenic. “It was disgusting,” Mattingly said.

    Litter had taken over.

  • Friends remember Lt. Ray Herman

    He loved his family, his job, his community and fishing.

    And on Saturday, April 2, retired Kentucky State Police Lt. Ray Herman, 64, of Campbellsburg, died after a fishing accident at Kentucky Dam.
    Herman and Andy Myers of Louisville drowned. A third man swam to safety.

    According to the Paducah Sun, Sgt. Garry Clark of Kentucky Fish and Wildlife said the water there is “more turbulent and can be dangerous,” but that fishermen frequent the area because that’s where the catfish are.

  • County grows 2.4%

    In the last decade Henry County grew — but not by much.

    According to data released last month by the U.S. Census Bureau, Henry County’s population increased by just 356 people to 15,416, a change of 2.4 percent from 2000. The increase marked the lowest growth rate since the 1990 census, which reflected a 0.7 percent increase in population from 1980.

  • Turners Station resident is looking for a few good Friends

    Betsy Packard is looking for a few Friends.

    That’s Friends of the Quaker variety, mind you.

    Packard, who is new to Henry County, has attended the Lexington (Quaker) Religious Society of Friends gatherings for several years.  Frankfort Friends also are a part of that group. Packard said there are about 90 people on the Lexington rolls with weekly attendance of between 40 and 50. Louisville has a chapter as well.