Local News

  • Traffic jams snarl inaugural Quaker State 400 NASCAR race

    By Valarie Honeycutt Spears
    Kentucky News Content Service

    Gov. Steve Beshear said Sunday he will work with officials at Kentucky Speedway to address the traffic flow and parking problems that plagued Saturday’s Quaker State 400.

  • Emergency Management issues advice for handling heat wave

    Submitted by Bruce Owens

    Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

    Most heat disorders occur because the victim has been overexposed to heat or has over-exercised for his or her age and physical condition. Older adults, young children, and those who are sick or overweight are more likely to succumb to extreme heat.

  • Coupons are coming back July 20!

    Few products offer individuals the opportunity to save more than they spend. Starting July 20, the Henry County Local will give readers this opportunity with the return of SmartSource coupons.

    Inside the Local each week, readers will find a coupon package regularly valued at more than $100 in savings through manufacturer, retail and restaurant coupons. Subscribers will usually find they can recoup the cost of a Local subscription in just one week of coupon savings.

  • Joint effort nets capture of Shelbyville man

    What began as an attempt to serve a warrant turned into a manhunt that eventually resulted in the arrest of a Shelbyville man.

    On Tuesday, June 28, officers from Eminence Police Department, along with Shelbyville Police Department Detective Jessie Paulley, attempted to serve a warrant on Jordan Clark, 19, for absconding from a robbery charge in Shelbyville.

    EPD Chief Carey Duncan said Paulley contacted EPD to serve the warrant on Sunnyside Drive, which the detective believed was in the city limits.

  • GED grads celebrate with Berry

    “It’s a tough road, but don’t give up... you’ll get where you need to go.”

    A tearful Amber Rosell shared those words with her Henry County Adult Education classmates Thursday night during the group’s graduation ceremony, which included a special guest.

  • Honoring the humble hankie

    Until the 1920s, they were used for everything from wiping away tears and wiping runny noses, to being transformed into dolls, or used as a signal to a prospective suitor.

    But in 1924, the Kleenex was born, and the humble handkerchief’s prominence began to fade.

    Last week, collectors of handkerchiefs and buttons gathered at Twin Oaks Nursing Center in New Castle to share their collections, and stories about the once popular accessory.

  • GOP, Dems pick jailer candidates

    After months of searching and interviewing, the Henry County Republican and Democratic Executive Committees have made their choices.

    Doug Kemp will represent the GOP and Scott Southworth will represent the Democrats in November in an election for Henry County Jailer.

    The position was vacated earlier this year after Republican Ronnie Stephens resigned from the post.

  • A family affair

    About halfway down a steep grade between Defoe and Frankfort in a snaking curve of U.S. 421, foot-stomping music rings out from the Six Mile Jamboree every Saturday night until the wee hours of the next morning.

    Dancers and revelers of all ages have filled the 256-seat-capacity venue to usher in 45 New Years in Henry County.

    Countless meals have been served, and hundreds of musicians have electrified audiences.

  • Court votes 4-2 to accept AOC offer

    The debate is over — Henry County will, by 2016, have a brand new or renovated and upgraded courthouse.

  • ‘Re-’ is the key for EIS

    In a July 28 open house, students and parents of Eminence Independent Schools will see a refurbished elementary school and gymnasium.
    EIS drafted a bid, which was sent to the state, for several aspects of the renovations, including demolition. That bid was accepted.

    Because of that and by investing a great deal of their own sweat equity, Superintendent Buddy Berry calculated their savings at about 40 percent.
    “We did over $80,000 of work ourselves,” he said. “When you have talented folks, it goes a long, long way.”