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Local News

  • Culture Shock

    Eric Raisor thought he knew it all. That was before he went to another country.

    Raisor enlisted in the U.S. Army in June 2010 and serves with the A. Co 412th CAB as a specialist in the RC-North in Mazar-e Sharif  in northern Afghanistan, .

    Raisor said once he traveled outside the United States the culture shock woke him up.

  • ‘Satan had got me’

    A Henry County man may face new charges in a sexual abuse case pending the investigation of three computer hard drives.

    Joseph David Martin, 38, of Turners Station, was arrested in 2011 and charged with having sex with an underage female who was 13 at the time the alleged crimes began. The alleged crimes took place over a three year period.

  • Lincoln Institute was like college

    Unlike many children, Jean Martin Hill went to the Lincoln Institute instead of Eminence High School.

    An uncle who had no children of his own would drive her to the school in Shelby County where she stayed during the week. Occasionally, Hill stayed at the school on weekends. The adjustment wasn’t easy at first, but the hardships Hill and many families endured were a part of life then.

    Her parents stressed the need for education and the doors it could open to a better life. When opportunity came, you took it — it wasn’t a choice.

  • CARE Team honors Druin

    She watched, jaw dropped, as one of her staffers surprised her.

    It took just a few seconds to realize what was going on.

    “Over 15 years ago, one woman not only decided that she wanted to make a difference, but that she would,” Melissa Blankenship told attendees of the Henry County CARE Team meeting.

    Through research, lobbying and grant writing, Nellie Druin “began building the foundation of the organization that would be known as the Henry County CARE Team,” Blankenship said.

  • C’Burg Community Center work is underway

    The Campbellsburg Community Center is inching closer to completion.

    Harold Broughton told the city councilors Monday night that 60 percent of the building’s exterior metal is now on, and should be completely on by the end of the weekend.

    Tuesday, crews were expected to install the center’s windows and doors. The center’s HVAC system is almost ‘roughed in,’ Broughton said, adding that “they’ve got some air ducts for (fresh air inflow)… but they couldn’t do that until the (exterior) metal was on.”

  • Don’t miss out on the EIC

    In 2013, federal tax credits will mean more for working families than ever before. As the economy struggles to recover from the recession, the Earned Income Credit can provide relief for many working families who are under economic stress. The EIC can help families pay back bills, avoid utility shut-offs or eviction, buy groceries, cover child care costs, or meet other needs. Working individuals and families need to know that help may be available when you file your 2013 tax return. You also need to know how and where to get assistance.

  • Tractor-trailer accident destroys vehicle leaves driver only bruised

    A tractor-trailer came over the hill on Mulberry Pike Monday carrying a load of flat-rolled steel from Steel Technologies near the Eminence Cemetery. The driver, Harold Devine of Eminence said a gust of wind pushed his tractor-trailer just enough to be in the ditch causing him to lose control of the vehicle. Eminence Police and Eminence Fire Department responded. Devine suffered bruises from a seat belt strap and sustained no serious injuries. The National Weather Service had issued a weather advisory for gusts of wind in the area that could reach up to 30 mph.

  • USPS proposes cutting Saturday mail

    The United States Postal Service has proposed eliminating Saturday letter delivery in an unprecedented effort to keep itself afloat and save $2 billion annually.

    USPS Board of Governors advised postal management last month to implement cost-cutting measures in order to avoid the further hemorrhaging of its finances.

  • State committee approves hemp bill

    The Kentucky Senate Agriculture Committee didn’t blow any smoke when it came to setting the industrial hemp bill on fire with unanimous support Monday.

    The bill would regulate Kentucky’s industrial hemp crops under the supervision of the state Department of Agriculture.

    Committee chair Sen. Paul Hornback, R-Shelbyville, sponsored the bill, which would require that farmers who want to grow the crop undergo criminal background checks before the department would issue their annual license.

  • Helping HANDS

    Megan Fleming was nervous when she found out she was pregnant.

    She went into preterm labor twice. Fleming found comfort with the help of the HANDS program.

    Fleming had her son, Elijah Downey, at 18. Fleming found out about the HANDS program before he was born and doesn’t regret signing up.