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Local News

  • Sholar has a passion for people

     

    Clyde Sholar had an appreciation for people and a desire to care for them at an early age. His passion grew into numerous professions doing the same.

    Most residents in Henry County know Sholar as co-owner of the funeral home in Pleasureville, but last year he retired from the National Guard and United States Geological Survey as an emeritus scientist with honors commemorating his work as a pioneer in safety protocol.

  • Massie touts bills, blasts House

    The Henry County GOP had a packed house Saturday evening for their Lincoln-Reagan dinner.

    “Last year we had 75 people,” chairman Jon Park said. “I think we broke that tonight.”

    The tables were indeed packed with at least 100 attendees as the GOP heard from Congressman Thomas Massie (R-Ky. 4), State Senator Paul Hornback and others.

  • Henry County’s link to the Fugitive Slave Act

    Under a waxing moon on what likely was a warm night on Saturday, Aug. 5, 1843, a family of six slaves was spirited across the Ohio River from a plantation in Hunters Bottom in Carroll County to Jefferson County, Ind., where they began a treacherous journey to freedom – and an important place in U.S. history.

  • P’ton sewers possible

    A plan is in the works to bring sewer access to Pendleton.

    The plan is in its infancy, and depending on funding sources may be years away from becoming more than a dream.

    The plan would bring sewer access to Pendleton’s businesses from La Grange. District 1 Magistrate Roger Hartlage and others, including Harold Bratton, hatched the idea at a Cracker Barrel.

    The idea is simple: an 8-inch gravity feed line to a pump station in Pendleton, then a 4-inch forced main to La Grange.

  • Park & play at county parks

    Despite a mild winter, county residents can remedy the need to get outdoors and quell the seasonable cabin fever by visiting one of the county parks.

    Both Harry Hill and the Henry County Recreation and Service Park offer exercise and recreation for families, individuals and public leagues,some year round.

    Travis Buchanan, Henry County Parks Coordinator, said the park sees activity even when temperatures reach low digits.

  • KY House puts up pension bill

    The Kentucky House of Representatives put forth a version of Senate Bill 2 last week that would add some footing to the sinking public pension deficit problem and help fund the pension.

    The House’s public pension bill would require local government and state employers to make full payments of the actuarial required contribution beginning in fiscal year 2014. The estimated $100 million contribution would come from the general fund budget annually.

  • A farm foundation

    The Callaway-Goodridge-Robertson Farm located just west of Smithfield gives another snapshot into one of the most influential families in Kentucky’s infancy as a state and the evolution of farming over the last 200 years in Henry County.

    The Beginnings

    Elizabeth Callaway and Fleet Goodridge married five months after Elizabeth’s father, Col. John Callaway — veteran of the War of 1812, builder of the Highlands house and who lived as a captive amongst the Shawnee for three years — died in 1825.

  • Economic Development Council considers Work Ready status

     When the Henry County Economic Development Council formed, one thing was certain — its members needed to set goals, create a road map for the future.

    Some of those goals were identified when the group created its work plan: creating a regional economic development group; hiring an economic development director; improving the county’s website; and becoming a Work Ready Community.

    Michael Gritton, director of the Kentuckiana Works, an agency that helps counties apply for Work Ready Community status.

  • Kentuckiana Works: 100 moving jobs are waiting

     Despite an economy that appears to be teetering on the edge of another recession, there are jobs available for the taking. And there are plenty of them according to Michael Gritton with Kentuckiana Works.

    Gritton told a meeting of the Henry County Economic Development Board recently that he has 100-200 jobs making at least $40,000… but he has no takers.

    Nursing and other healthcare fields, as well as information technology job training is available, but Gritton said that moving companies find themselves in need of trained workers.

  • Residents want to preserve city’s past

    The pending arrival of a CVS pharmacy drove a handful of concerned residents to gather last week and discuss the need for a preservation ordinance.

    Eric Whisman, education and outreach coordinator for Preservation Kentucky, and Eminence resident Lance Minnis asked concerned citizens to meet regarding the development which may result in the demolition of several buildings tied to the county and city’s past.