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Local News

  • It’s chili time

    The Henry County Relay for Life committee wants to know... who’s got the best chili?

    You get to have a say in answering that question Sunday afternoon at the Relay for Life kickoff meeting. The kickoff is set for 4 p.m. at the Henry County 4-H building at the fairgrounds.

    Henry County Relay committee chairperson Tawnja Morris said that 12 teams have signed up to compete in the cookoff.

    The cookoff was simply an idea that could spark a little competitive spirit between the Relay teams, rather than coming to a speaker-focused meeting.

  • Cravens given OK to pursue lease

    It’s a siren call Henry County Sheriff Danny Cravens has sounded more than once: The sheriff’s department needs more space.

    During the November meeting of the Henry County Fiscal Court, Cravens was given permission to negotiate a potential lease of the Henry County Health Department building.

  • Committee drafts alcohol ordinance

    When the Henry County alcohol ordinance finally takes shape, it will mirror that of Oldham County.

    A committee composed of Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent and Magistrates Jerry Beasley and Roger Hartlage hashed out the new ordinance, which is based on Oldham’s.

    The group changed few items from Oldham’s ordinance, namely the license and renewal fees, and the regulatory license fee. If approved, the ordinance sets Henry County’s license and renewal fees at $400, with the regulatory fee set at 6 percent of alcohol sales.

  • Committee drafts alcohol ordinance
  • Smith wants to keep some animals

    Terri L. Smith made her first court appearance Monday, Jan. 9, since being arraigned on 218 counts of second-degree animal abuse stemming from the Dec. 12 puppy mill/animal hoarding bust at her home in rural Campbellsburg.

    Judge Diana Wheeler gave Henry County Attorney Virginia Harrod until Feb. 6 to respond to a request for discovery, filed by Smith’s attorney, George R. Carter, of Louisville, and scheduled the next pretrial hearing for Feb. 20.

  • Henry County 
resident sues health dept.

    A former employee of the North Central District Health Department has filed a lawsuit against the department, claiming she was fired unjustly.

    Angela Roberts of Henry County, a nurse with the health department, claims in her lawsuit, filed Dec. 21 in Shelby Circuit Court, that she was fired because health department officials found out she had notified the Labor Cabinet when the health department refused to pay her for overtime hours she had worked.

  • Court to set rules for liquor sales

    With the vote now in the past, Henry County and New Castle city officials now have the task of compiling ordinances to regulate the sale of by-the-drink liquor sales.

    Voters supported the “moist” issue by a 2-1 margin in both a countywide referendum and a New Castle referendum held Dec. 13. By-the-drink liquor sales will only be available when served with a meal in restaurants with seating for 50 or more customers.

  • Attorney suggests new policies for P’Ville clerk

    One month after a city commissioner said she would call for an audit of the city, Pleasureville has received a letter from the Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts.

    Pleasureville City Attorney Bill Brammell said the city received a letter expressing concerns about the very issues that Commissioner Pam Bramblett raised during the commission’s December meeting.

  • Animal rescue volunteers feel a calling to help

    “Dan and his staff... have made a bad situation as good as it could be,” Magistrate Roger Hartlage told the Fiscal Court on Dec. 20. “The working ethic these guys put out is second to none. They did not stop, and will not stop, until it’s done. I commend you for that.”

    Nobody knew just how big a task faced them at 25 Allyson Lane.

    But on Monday, Dec. 12, Henry County Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt marshaled a few regular volunteers to assist in what one said was a big raid.

  • In recovery: Rescued dogs on the mend

    The 240 animals confiscated Dec. 12 from a puppy mill/hoarding situation on Allyson Lane in rural Campbellsburg have all found refuge with foster homes, veterinarians and animal rescue groups in the region, according to Henry County Animal Control Officer Dan Flinkfelt.

    So far, the majority of the animals have survived. Two cats that were removed from the property died in transit; one was euthanized after it tested positive for feline leukemia, a deadly, incurable and highly contagious disease.