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Local News

  • Patels are living the American Dream one shop at a time

    As a child Mike Patel heard that everyone in America was rich.

    At 19, he would take a chance on the American dream and leave engineering school.

    “My aunt had applied for us to get visas in the 80s,” Patel said. “It took 15 years for us to get an opening to come. My dad came to me while I was in college in Nagpur and asked me if I wanted to go. It was a hard decision.”

  • Clements named Cook’s employee of the year

    Bo Clements can’t stand not working.

    Clements started working at the Eminence Cook’s in 1989. He left working in dairy and tobacco farming for a spot in shipping and receiving. Clements will tell anyone the only thing he cares about is pleasing the customer, his boss and staying busy.
    “I started helping here delivering lawn mowers. I was fresh off the farm and didn’t know much,” Clements said. “I’ve been here over 20 years and I’m just glad to have a job.”

  • Henry man indicted in Shelbyville
  • CVS to present plan to Triple S

    Four months after taking over Smith-McKenney in the Village Plaza shopping center in Shelbyville, CVS will move its store to the intersection of U.S. 60 and the Shelbyville Bypass, where the condemned Wesley Apartments now stand.

    The company presented its long-awaited development plan to the Triple S Planning Commission at its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Stratton Center.

    The plan calls for a 13,225-square-foot retail center, with a pharmacy and drive-through, and includes 69 parking spaces.

  • Public will not get milked by hefty dairy prices

    By DAVE TAYLOR
    Landmark News Service
    The potential hefty price rise predicted recently for milk will not occur anytime soon, according to local and statewide dairy leaders.
    The average gallon of milk costs about $3, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Recently, national media outlets had predicted a fear of prices as high as $7 per gallon due to issues related to a farm bill that was tied into the “Fiscal Cliff” in Washington.

  • Life is a cherry bowl

    Woodworking keeps Neal Morris alive and he refuses to sit still.

    The numerous finished woodworking products speak to his mastery as a craftsman, but witnessing his process reveals Morris’ is a true Renaissance man.

  • KSP RAIDs drivers

     For Trooper BradArterburn, public affairs officer for Post 5, lowering traffic fatalities doesn’t mean writing more traffic tickets but raising awareness about dangerous driving habits.

    Kentucky State Police started a campaign for removing distracted, impaired and aggressive drivers in November. The Operation RAID — Remove Aggressive, Impaired and Distracted drivers — strategy combines compiled local crash data with an increased law enforcement presence.

  • Faith and hope were Lost Boy’s tools

    The Rev. John Ater told Henry County Middle School students faith and hope proved his greatest survival tools as a ‘Lost Boy’ of Sudan.

    HCMS students recently read A Long Walk to Water, by Linda Sue Park, which gives two narratives, 23 years apart, following the lives of two youths that face adversity due to political unrest and a lack of natural resources.

    Ater came to the states at 20. He recalled vividly how Sudanese rebels killed young boys as a measure of wiping out their future enemy.

  • New Cafe could be Espressoly for You

    Jennifer Cook wanted a business both teenagers and adults could enjoy in her hometown, New Castle.

    The obstacles of updating an older building with modern health and plumbing codes commonly scare new business owners away, but Cook hopes to change that.

    “I grew up in Henry County and as a teen we constantly wanted somewhere to hang out,” Cook said. “We hung out on Bardstown Road and I thought a coffee shop would be a simple idea.”

  • Statehood roots for Highlands House

    The house in Henry County historically known as the Highlands in the rolling hillside just south of Floyd’s Fork and KY 22 was once home to a family whose lives intertwined with Kentucky’s birth as a state and the bloody hunting ground.