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Local News

  • USPS proposes cutting Saturday mail

    The United States Postal Service has proposed eliminating Saturday letter delivery in an unprecedented effort to keep itself afloat and save $2 billion annually.

    USPS Board of Governors advised postal management last month to implement cost-cutting measures in order to avoid the further hemorrhaging of its finances.

  • State committee approves hemp bill

    The Kentucky Senate Agriculture Committee didn’t blow any smoke when it came to setting the industrial hemp bill on fire with unanimous support Monday.

    The bill would regulate Kentucky’s industrial hemp crops under the supervision of the state Department of Agriculture.

    Committee chair Sen. Paul Hornback, R-Shelbyville, sponsored the bill, which would require that farmers who want to grow the crop undergo criminal background checks before the department would issue their annual license.

  • Helping HANDS

    Megan Fleming was nervous when she found out she was pregnant.

    She went into preterm labor twice. Fleming found comfort with the help of the HANDS program.

    Fleming had her son, Elijah Downey, at 18. Fleming found out about the HANDS program before he was born and doesn’t regret signing up.

  • Lindsay inspired others

    John Lindsay didn’t want to go to Lincoln Institute during the early years of integration.

    Lindsay’s decision gave family members and former classmates from the Merriweather and King Street schools the confidence to attend the previously all white school-Eminence High School.

  • Sulphur’s demise was closely tied to automobiles

    The expansion of the railroad stopped progress in the river towns like Lockport and Gestville where goods, supplies and passengers relied on the steamboat.

    Similarly, the automobile would stop progress in towns like Sulphur.

    Sulphur has had as many names as it has changes to its hilly rural landscape.

  • Eminence Reading Buddies

    For 30 minutes each Friday, buddies at Eminence Elementary and Middle Schools get together and enjoy a good book.

    The Reading Buddies program began at Eminence Independent Schools eight years ago, the expression of an idea that started on an Arby’s napkin.

    Language Arts teacher Jennifer Montgomery and librarian Penny Bland were working on their National Board Certification, thinking of projects they could collaborate on.

    For seven or eight weeks, first grade students and eighth grade students meet in the school’s library.

  • Thompson house built in early 1800s

    One of the last remaining properties in the series on the Historic Registry in Henry County, the Thompson House captured the imagination of its builders, the current owners and most certainly its future visitors.

    Almost secretively nestled behind a frontage of trees, the house sits between KY 22 and Giltner Lane.

    The most distinguishing quality is the house’s unique appearance.

    The house’s architectural style marries themes from the Greek Revival and Italianate period.

  • Pension to be legislators’ focus

     State legislators will work out the kinks for a hybrid public-employee pension plan that may dig Kentucky’s retirement benefit program out of its fiscal grave.

    State House and Senate members reconvened the General Assembly Tuesday, tackling the biggest elephant in the room: the public-employee pension plan.

    State officials looked at data from the Pew Center on The States analysis which estimates Kentucky has a $30 billion unfunded liability.

  • Volunteers, samaritans save dog

    It was 4:30, maybe 5:00, on Jan. 29, when Cebele Cambron saw it happen.

    A dog, about 20 pounds, was hit by a car on I-71. The dog crumbled in the right hand side of the northbound lane. The car that hit the dog kept going, without even tapping the brakes, she said.

    But Cambron and another driver who saw the hit did stop.

  • A school of love and hope

    Florance Davis wants people to remember that her school was one of hope and love.

    The Merriweather and King Street School Fund preserves the hope and honors the history of the school in the form of an annual scholarship.

    Together they send a message of compassion and an optimistic future.

    Davis went to the all-black Merriweather and King Street School from the first through eighth grades. She graduated in 1964. Her older sister had gone to Eminence High School, the integrated white school, before her. She was nervous.