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Local News

  • County has new senator

    Henry and Carroll counties are no longer part of the state’s 26th Senate district. Those counties, which, historically, have been served by Republican Sen. Ernie Harris, now fall into the 20th District, represented by Sen. Paul Hornback, also a Republican.

    Statewide population growth, as documented by the 2010 U.S. census, means districts for both the state House of Representatives and Senate were redrawn, approved and signed into law by Gov. Steve Beshear last week. Lawmakers are still working to redraw the six districts for the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • 'We had one bite of our appetizer, and then the floor rumbled'

    Henry County native Joe Ryan, 23, is looking forward to a trip to Destin, Fla., with friends later this year, after he graduates from Eastern Kentucky University.

    It will be a landlocked location – “No captain needed for time on the beach,” he said during a phone interview Monday.

    Seems mundane, but Ryan is ready for mundane.

  • Chamber Awards Information

    It's time for the annual Henry County Chamber of Commerce Awards. The dinner is scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Thursday, March 29, at the Eminence Christian Church Fellowship Hall.

    The Chamber wants your nominations for the awards. Anyone can nominate for these, and we want a number of nominations for each category.

  • Study puts first-year value on casinos at $1.7 billion

    Allowing casinos at eight Kentucky racetracks would have an estimated $1.7 billion economic impact on the state during the casinos’ first full year of operation, according to a study released Monday by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

    That would include $464.7 million in gaming tax revenue, $164.6 million of which would go to racing-industry programs, according to the Kentucky Gaming Market Analysis and Impacts Report, which was paid for by racing-industry interests.

  • Hatfields take unconventional approach to life, business

    Three years ago, operating a home-based family business in the small town of New Castle probably wasn’t on Drake Hatfield’s radar.

    But then again, Hatfield’s life has been far from the usual.

    He grew up in Panama, where his parents worked as missionaries to “plant” churches. When he was 5 years old in 1989, the U.S. military invaded that country and captured its leader, Manuel Noriega. His parents told him he slept through the bombing.

  • Suicide is 10th leading cause of death

    This week alone, nationwide, statistics show that 100 young people ages 10-24 years old will take their own lives. It is the second leading cause of death among college age youth, the third leading cause of death among youth ages 18-24 and the fourth leading cause of death among children ages 10-14.

    But, because it is regarded as a taboo subject, suicide is also known as the “Silent Epidemic,” according to Jerry Lucas.

  • It’s chili time

    The Henry County Relay for Life committee wants to know... who’s got the best chili?

    You get to have a say in answering that question Sunday afternoon at the Relay for Life kickoff meeting. The kickoff is set for 4 p.m. at the Henry County 4-H building at the fairgrounds.

    Henry County Relay committee chairperson Tawnja Morris said that 12 teams have signed up to compete in the cookoff.

    The cookoff was simply an idea that could spark a little competitive spirit between the Relay teams, rather than coming to a speaker-focused meeting.

  • Cravens given OK to pursue lease

    It’s a siren call Henry County Sheriff Danny Cravens has sounded more than once: The sheriff’s department needs more space.

    During the November meeting of the Henry County Fiscal Court, Cravens was given permission to negotiate a potential lease of the Henry County Health Department building.

  • Committee drafts alcohol ordinance

    When the Henry County alcohol ordinance finally takes shape, it will mirror that of Oldham County.

    A committee composed of Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent and Magistrates Jerry Beasley and Roger Hartlage hashed out the new ordinance, which is based on Oldham’s.

    The group changed few items from Oldham’s ordinance, namely the license and renewal fees, and the regulatory license fee. If approved, the ordinance sets Henry County’s license and renewal fees at $400, with the regulatory fee set at 6 percent of alcohol sales.

  • Committee drafts alcohol ordinance