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Local News

  • Mr. Goodwin goes to Washington

    Staff writer/photographer

    A passion for journalism, both print and broadcast has earned an HCHS senior a trip to Washington.

    Brandon Goodwin, a senior at Henry County High School, has already come a long way and is still going places. An Oklahoman transplanted to Franklinton,  Goodwin soon will travel to Washington, D.C., to collect a scholarship for outstanding work in the field of journalism.

  • Grayson rallies with Henry Co. GOP

    Staff writer/photographer

    It may only be February 2009, but for some in Henry County, it’s perfect time to plan for the November 2010 elections.

    Members of the Henry County Republican Party gathered at the Henry County Courthouse Feb. 10 to discuss strategies aimed at claiming some of the local offices to be decided Nov. 2, 2010. Henry County GOP Chairman Rex Morgan said the number of registered Republicans in the county is up by at least 10 percent.

  • Emergency funds available through TCCAA

    Tri County Community Action Agency has been awarded federal funds under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program. TCCAA has been chosen to receive $12,000 for emergency food and shelter programs in Henry County. Public or private voluntary agencies interested in apply ing for EFSP program funds must contact Bryan Raisor at (502)845-7808 by Feb. 24.

     

  • Relay for Life Kickoff to feature columnist Byron Crawford

    Henry County Relay For Life Kick Off is scheduled for Monday, February 23. The event will be held at the 4-H building at the Henry County Fairgrounds at 7 p.m. This year’s featured speaker will be Byron Crawford.

  • You are not Alone

    Staff writer/photographer

    One night, after being diagnosed with breast cancer, Dana Rose woke to find her husband Russ staring at her. She asked why he was doing so. He answered simply. “It’s my job to take care of you,” he said.

    It’s been nine months since the 41-year old mother found a lump while showering. “I think it was kind of a thing from God,” she said. “I found this lump two months before time for my physical.”

  • New Castle extending brush disposal

    New Castle residents will be allowed to bring brush and limbs downed from the winter storm to the city lot at East Cross Main until Saturday, Feb. 28. The lot will be open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon.

  • C’Burg sewer divided into ‘sheds’

    General Manager/Editor

    The work to get a full assessment of the Campbellsburg sewer system continues — in an effort to focus its efforts, Carrollton Utilities has divided Campbellsburg sewer system into seven “sewer sheds.”

    Doing so, CU Manager Bill Osborn told the Campbellsburg City Council Monday night, will allow the company to narrow down just where some of the system’s problems are. And the area around Campbellsburg Elementary School has a few problems, including leaking manholes, among other things.

  • What are our children learning?

    The question is not whether children and teenagers are learning from today’s media but rather what are they learning?

    According to the April 2006 issue of Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, TV, movies, video games, and Internet use have become a “major public health issue” among youth today and that “[this] intersects with many other issues that are critically important to child health, including violence, obesity, tobacco/alcohol use, and risky sexual behaviors.”

  • Relay For Life Kick off planned

    Henry County Relay For Life Kick Off is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 23. The event will be held at the 4-H building at the Henry County Fairgrounds at 7 p.m. This year’s featured speaker will be Byron Crawford.

  • Restoring power can be long job

    Staff writer/photographer

    Thursday morning the sun dazzled on the snow and ice-covered ridge topping Barton Lane close to Pt. Pleasant Christian Church.

    The serenity of a devastatingly beautiful winter scene was only disturbed by animal tracks criss-crossing the ice and generators humming outside the scattered houses. An open charcoal grill outside a shed playfully labeled the Pitts was, possibly, that family’s only means of cooking supper since the power went out in the early morning hours of Jan. 28.