.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Robbery charges going to grand jury

     

    By Kenny Colston

    Landmark News Service

  • Program for seniors celebrates golden years

     Staff Report

    Local seniors will have an opportunity to learn how to embrace their golden years through an upcoming educational program.

  • Rolling success story

     

    This time last year, Sandi West was burning the midnight oil and she was a little worried.

    “We worked up to the last minute. I was excited, but extremely nervous,” West said. “I didn’t know how people would respond.”

  • Heating assistance program opens enrollment

    Two LIHEAP programs provided nearly $110,000 worth of assistance to Henry County residents last winter, according to information from Tri-County Community Action Agency. Enough requests came in for the crisis program, it ran out of funds a month early.
    Tri-County will begin taking applications for the subsidy funding in the Low Income Heating Energy Assistance Program in November, said Pam Sage, the LIHEAP director. There’s a sign up  schedule that begins Nov. 3 for those whose last name starts with A or B and continues through Dec. 11.

  • Jobless rates down in all 120 Ky. counties

    Unemployment rates fell in all 120 Kentucky counties between September 2013 and September 2014, according to a news release from the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.
    State officials note this is the second consecutive month that Kentucky has seen a year-over-year drop in all counties, the news release noted. Last month was the first time on record this had happened.

  • News Briefs

    Road Clean Up
    Henry County’s annual fall road clean up is scheduled for Nov. 1, beginning at 8 a.m..
    Organizers ask that motorists around the county drive carefully as many volunteers from non-profit organizations will pick up litter on 170 miles of roads.
    Funds have been provided by the Litter Abatement Grant.
    For more information, call the Henry County Judge-Executive’s Office at (502) 845-5707.

    KSP Checkpoints

  • Hometown Pizza's 'Every Slice Matters' benefits Help Center

    Hometown Pizza will serve up assistance to the homegrown, faith-based service that helps others in Henry County.
    Through their “Every Slice Matters” effort, the regional restaurant chain with a location in Eminence decided to look at the needs of the Henry County Help Center, according to Donna Sabo, director of marketing at Hometown.
    Henry County Help Center has taken on the mission of providing food assistance to more than 1,300 citizens and hundreds of families across the county.

  • Local Buzz Week of Oct. 29

    Church Services
    Pleasureville Baptist Church will host revival services Nov. 2-5. Sunday morning service at 11 a.m., evening services at 7 p.m. Rev. Scott Smith, will be the evangelist.
    Campbellsburg Baptist Church will celebrate International Day of Prayer on Sunday, Nov. 6 at 6 p.m. with speaker Brad Rumer and worship leader Peggy Rumer. They will also be collecting donations for Bibles Unbound, a group that sends Bibles overseas.

  • Creating more awareness of pancreatic cancer

    After a six-month battle, Judy Mason Sparrow, 69, passed away from pancreatic cancer. That’s when her granddaughter, Catherine McKinley, decided to be an advocate for pancreatic cancer patients and their families.
    McKinley serves as the community engagement chair of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. Her role is to engage the local community by bringing awareness to this specific type of cancer.

  • 'Fire and brimstone' preacher visits

    Author and re-enactor, Eddie Price, presented to a packed house at last week’s Henry County Historical Society meeting.  Price portrayed a member of the congregation at the Cane Ridge Revival of 1801.  This Bourbon County revival is proclaimed as one of the top five events to impact Kentucky’s history.  It introduced “fire and brimstone” preaching to the lands West of the Appalachian and was attended by as many as 25,000 people at a time when Kentucky’s population was only half a million.