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Local News

  • Seeing the forest through the trees?

    Staff writer/photographer

    Jan Aaron said she was devastated when an old stand of pine trees recently was chopped down on the banks of Lake Jericho.

    Aaron has lived on the Bates Lane end of the lake for more than 20 years and fears the cutting of those trees will worsen conditions around the lake, especially soil erosion.

    “They are clean-cutting to the point where there isn’t a blade of grass,” Aaron said, “tall, healthy pine trees cut down.”

  • UK helps improve life in Henry County

    Residents of Henry County may not realize the ways the University of Kentucky continually touches their lives, by providing education to 39 young Henry Countians in the 2008-09 academic year, assisting business people, advising homemakers and agricultural enterprises and offering guidance on health care.  

    UK’s 2008-09 academic year began with nine Henry County freshmen, 10 sophomores, eight juniors and eight seniors attending classes, along with four others pursuing graduate degrees or professional degrees in nursing, medicine, pharmacy and law.

  • A look back at the news and events of 2008

    JANUARY

  • U.S. Census to get underway in 2009

    General Manager

    With 2009 just a day away, the United States Census Bureau is preparing for its once-a-decade project – conducting the U.S. Census.

    As part of that, the bureau’s offices throughout the nation will be recruiting for the enumerators who will do the footwork of counting the nation’s residents.

  • Circumstances unclear in teen’s death

    Staff writer/photographer

    A Henry County family is in mourning this week after learning that a family member reported missing last week has been found dead.

    Just what happened between Tuesday, Dec. 23, when 19-year old Brittany Wade of Smithfield went missing and Saturday morning, Dec. 27, when she was found is unknown.

    Wade was reported as a missing person to the Kentucky State Police Campbellsburg Post 5 last week.

  • Veteran gets medal after 60 years

    Staff writer/photographer

    Depending on the perspective of glass half full or glass half empty, Pleasureville resident Uley Washburn either received an early Christmas present this year or a very, very late one.

    Though discharged from the U.S. Army in 1946, Washburn did not receive his Philippine Liberation Medal until this year. “It was 62 years late,” he said. “It was on my discharge I was due this, but I just now got it.”

  • Local holiday traditions are varied

    Staff report

    Throughout the coming days, families will gather and celebrate Christmas. Many will incorporate their own traditions, some common, and some a little unorthodox. We spoke with a handful of Henry County residents and officials, and the following are their traditions:

    Lynn Adams

    New Castle City Clerk Lynn Adams said her family’s holiday visits begin with with her in-laws starting the Saturday before Christmas.

  • EHS gets bronze again

    General Manager

    For the second year in a row, Eminence High School has been named to the U.S. News and World report list of America’s best high schools.

    And for the second year in a row, Eminence earned a bronze medal on that list. EHS Principal Steve Frommeyer said the accomplishment is a testament to the school’s hard working students and teachers.

  • Students test quality of Little Kentucky River

    Staff writer/photographer

    For months Eminence High School science students have been testing the quality of Henry County’s portion of the Little Kentucky River. They report that the river is healthy which is good news for this area’s watershed.

    A watershed, also known as a drainage basin, is defined on Wikipedia as “where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water such as a river, lake, reservoir, estuary, wetland, sea or ocean.”

  • Homestead earns 5 star rating

    The Centers For Medicare and Medicaid Services have just announced that Homestead Nursing Center of New Castle has been rated as a 5 STAR nursing facility, one of only 27 in the State of Kentucky. The Federal Government instituted the star rating to assist consumers in measuring a facility’s quality of care based on state inspections records, staffing and other measurements. The rating system goes from one star (poorest) to five stars (highest). Nationally, only about 12% of this country’s nursing homes achieve an overall 5 STAR rating.