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Local News

  • STEPtember promotes healthy lifestyle choices

    Staff writer/photographer

    Melissa Jeffries walked the entire length of the Alaskan Iditarod Trail — virtually, that is.

    The equivalent of 90 miles Jeffries, the Henry County Public Schools nurse, said the walk took her about a month to complete.

    Jeffries walked the Iditarod by logging onto the YMCA’s America on the Move Foundation’s STEPtember contest. “You pick a walking trail, and record your steps or activity for one month,” she said.

  • Bethlehem nativity set to mark 50th anniversary

    Staff writer/photographer

    Oh come all ye faithful, the Bethlehem Nativity has reached a big number.

    Nativity coordinator Kevin Croxton said this year’s 50th anniversary presentation marks a milestone.

    “We’re trying to get the word out,” he said. “It’s kind of neat that it’s been going on this long.”

  • Eminence Independent Schools utilizing multiple grants

    by Cindy DiFazio

    Staff writer/photographer

    At its November meeting, Eminence Independent Schools Superintendent Donald Aldridge told the members of the board of education he had been alerted in a Superintendent’s Advisory to possible budgetary shortfalls due to a dip in state revenue.

    “There are some dollars we probably won’t receive next year,” he said.

  • A dream come true

    Troy Cook will fulfill a lifelong dream while visiting his hometown of Eminence over the Thanksgiving holidays. Cook will take the stage at the Kentucky Center for the Arts’ Whitney Hall singing in the opera, “Werther.”

    “I’ve always wanted to be on the Kentucky Center for the Arts stage,” he said. “I guess you have to go away to New York and come back.”

    Cook has been relaxing at the Eminence home of his mother, Martha Cook for the past couple of weeks.

  • A work in progress

    General Manager

    In more ways than one, Henry County High School may be a work in progress. While the school’s physical structure is under construction, there’s a movement within to improve the school’s test scores.

    Principal Jim Masters acknowledges there is still much work to be done, and said Monday that his staff is prepared for the task ahead.

  • Support group provides hope to MS patients, families

    Staff Writer/Photographer

    When John Roberts had trouble using his hands the doctor said he suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome.

    When his vision blurred, a detached retina was blamed. When Roberts, of Eminence, had difficulties with his balance doctors diagnosed an inner ear condition. The worst was when doctors said he’d had a stroke.

  • Sewer contract oversight to be corrected

    General Manager

    A 14-year oversight in a waste water treatment agreement will be corrected in 2009, as the City of Eminence will increase waste water treatment rates for the City of Pleasureville.

    Pleasureville, however, has said it will not pass that rate increase along to its customers.

    The agreement was signed in 1994 between the two cities, and initially was subject to review every two years. That review process fell through the cracks.

  • Scribers — a good thing, right under our noses

    Executive Director, Henry County Chamber of Commerce

    Often we overlook a good thing that is right under our noses.  When we decide to have a meal away from home, we automatically think going out of county, but Henry County is blessed with many restaurants that serve wonderful food at reasonable prices.

  • County workers to get raise

    General Manager

    Despite the sour economy, county employees will receive a cost of living raise next year.

    The Henry County Fiscal Court voted last week to approve a four percent cost of living increase, but not merit increases.

    Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent said Monday that the four percent raise amounts to around 35-50 cents per hour, depending on each county employee’s current hourly rate.

  • HCPS named in lawsuit against former teacher

    A 2008 Shelby County High School graduate is suing a former teacher and the staff of three Kentucky school districts, charging they were complicit in sexual harassment and wanton negligence.

    In a lawsuit filed Nov. 6 in Shelby County Circuit Court, Elizabeth Reynolds, 18, has charged former teacher Scott Stumbo with “intentional and outrageous” conduct that has caused her to suffer “severe emotional distress.”

    This civil suit comes 10 months after Stumbo submitted an Alford plea to criminal charges of sexual harassment of a student.