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Local News

  • College, Career: focus of 2012-13

    As the summer break comes to a close, students and parents will return to a school routine as early as next week, but according to Henry and Eminence school boards officials, the new school year will be anything but routine.

    The biggest buzz in both districts emphasizes the need for students to be college and career ready. Using new teaching strategies, technology and testing to ascertain students’ proficiencies, teachers and students can maximize classroom time to increase their success rate in pursuit of higher education and a secure career.

    Henry County

  • Pool hall offers food, fun - just like the old days

     Bond’s Hall in Pleasureville isn’t just a pool hall. It’s an institution.

    If, according to the Irish, a pub is a poor man’s university, then owners Owen and Sue Bond should be charging tuition. Bond’s Pool Hall doesn’t gather a poor clientele, but rather patrons exceedingly rich and generous with friendly jabs during conversation over a game of nine ball, or while eating some of its famous burgers at lunch.

  • Farrier a feature of Harvest Showcase

    Although his clients usually tower over him and outweigh him by a few hundred pounds, Mike Ratcliff likes what he does.

    Ratcliff likes the independence of being his own boss. He travels more than 100 miles to shoe horses – from thoroughbreds to gypsy vanners.

    He decided what he wanted to with his life while working on a farm.

    “A friend of mine and I were in tobacco field, I was about 18 or 19,” Ratcliff said. “They were shoeing horses, and I decided that was what I wanted to do.”

  • Service dog gives Harer independence

    Nicole Harer knew her life would never be normal.

    Her health complications kept any sense of independence a dream.

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and post-traumatic stress disorder made her a regular at hospitals. On top of that, she went undiagnosed with diabetes type 1 for six years. The lack of glucose in the cells of her brain affected her everyday life. She was hospitalized for weeks at a time; and once doctors diagnosed the problem, the damage seemed terminal.

  • New Five Star in Eminence set to open July 25

     

     

    The new Five Star location can’t open soon enough for patrons who regularly wait for gas on the cramped lot of the old station. The new location, just across the street, will have not just more space, but will offer more choices, too.

  • HCPS: ‘BYOD’ in 2012-13

    By BRAD BOMAN
    Reporter/Photographer
    The increasing presence of technology, such as iPhones, iPads and smart phones, that are available to students can be daunting. But the Henry County Public School Board decided Monday that this resource should be tapped to engage and enhance the educational process.
    The board adopted a new “Bring your own device” policy, similar to policies in districts across the nation that allow students to use their own technology at school for finding information and other resources on the Internet.

  • Officials mark opening of shared shelter
  • Businesses entice diners to eat out

    Despite an uncertain economy, new and expanding businesses in Henry County give residents a reason for dining out.

    Country Collectibles

    Steve Losch never intended to expand his business to include hommade smoked barbecue, live music or outside seating for 50. But with the new county liquor law, he saw a way to keep residents from dining out in another county.

  • Mahoney state’s Driver Trainer of Year

    William Mahoney, a vital part of the Henry County Public Schools’ Transportation Department for 25 years, received Kentucky’s Driver Trainer of the Year award June 27. 

    Presented by the Student Transportation Association of Kentucky and the Kentucky Department of Education at STAK’s annual conference, the award recognizes one school transportation employee each year who has provided outstanding leadership as a trainer.

  • It’s a family tradition for the Clarks

    Joe Clark and his sons have their own way of doing things.

    Whether it’s his dry stone masonry or his sons’ music, the Clarks’ craftsmanship reaches deeper than the topsoil of trend and builds more on a foundation of tradition.

    Clark is a self-made man who started as a stonemason in 1985 when he repaired a rock wall in Owenton for the state. While he worked on the job, he didn’t know it was an historic wall or that it would lead him to his own family business in dry stone masonry.