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Local News

  • Being a good neighbor? Court approves fence policy for park

    General Manager

    Be a good neighbor.

    If there was any other theme to emerge from last week’s Henry County Fiscal Court meeting, that was it. The phrase worked its way into several issues before the court last week, including fence installation at the new county park.

    Ray Powell said he wanted to be a good neighbor and work with the county on creating a fence line around the park property — which adjoins his own property.

  • Pleasureville pressure woes to ease

    General Manager

    Years of low water pressure may soon come to an end for residents in, and around, Pleasureville.

    A new water tower has risen above the city’s tree line, though welding marks on the tank’s exterior may make the tank look older than it really is..

    Once completed, the new tower will have three times the capacity of its predecessor, which should help alleviate years of low water pressure problems in the area.

  • Smithfield to celebrate new park

    General Manager

    A big celebration is on tap in the county’s smallest incorporated community.

    Smithfield will host Music in the Park Saturday evening in an event that will showcase the city’s most recent acquisition — a one acre parcel of ground that expands the city’s small park.

    The celebration, which starts at 5 p.m. Saturday, will feature music by Dave Stahl and Reid Moore, will be catered by Our Best, and feature a few homemade desserts from Smithfield Christian Church.

  • Student gets an education in transportation

    Staff writer/photographer

    From horses on the hoof to horses under the hood of a race car, Jessica Riley, a 14-year old freshman at Henry County High School, learned a lot about transportation over the summer.

    Riley was one of 18 Kentucky high school students who attended Kentucky State University’s Summer Transportation Program.

    “We studied all about planes, buses and boats,” Riley said. “We studied horses because back in the old days they used horses for transportation.”

  • HCPS progressing toward CATS goals

    General Manager

    If the hopes of Henry County Public Schools officials hold merit, the winds of change could bring a boost to the district’s CATS scores.

    Gains in portfolio scores at Henry County Middle School and Henry County High School, and gains in math scores at the middle school, gave Superintendent Tim Abrams hope.

    “I’m very excited about the future for both of those schools,” he said, adding that the 2008-2009 school year brings increased expectations for all students.

  • HCSO, NCPD investigating vehicle break-ins

    Staff writer/photographer

    Police are investigating a string of vehicle break-ins, all of which occurred one Sunday in August.

    A total of 24 vehicles were broken into inside New Castle city limits within a five-hour period on Aug. 24. Police believe the crimes occurred between the hours of 1:30 and 6:30 a.m.

    Henry County Sheriff’s Deputy Bill Hudson is investigating the crimes, along with New Castle Police Chief John Porter. “Every vehicle was unlocked,” Hudson said, “and they just ransacked them.”

  • HCMS students earn special recognition

    Staff writer/photographer

    Students at Henry County Middle School went “green” to earn a Superior rating at the national Project Citizen showcase in New Orleans.

    The 18 students from sixth through eighth grade collaborated on a project to recycle plastic water bottles titled “Make Recycling a Habit.” HCMS won over three other Kentucky schools to earn the honor of participating at the national level.

  • EIS makes CATS goal

    General Manager

    For Eminence Independent Schools, the 2008 CATS results brought mostly good news.

    As a district, EIS exceeded its accountability goal of 83.7 with a biennium accountability index of 85.4. The district also continued a reduction in its novice rate, falling below its novice goal of 15.23 with an average of 10.22 for the 2007-2008 biennium.

  • IKE HUFFS & PUFFS & BLOWS THE TREES DOWN

    General Manager

    The remnants of Hurricane Ike blew through the Kentuckiana region Sunday afternoon leaving downed trees and power lines in its wake – but Henry County was left relatively unscathed.

    The winds left hundreds of thousands of LG&E and Kentucky Utilities customers without power throughout the region. Monday afternoon, more than 240,000 LG&E and KU customers still were without power. In Louisville, the National Guard was brought in to help patrol in the city and aid with clean-up.

  • Campbellsburg sewer, annexation face new problem

    General Manager

    A Campbellsburg property owner warned the Campbellsburg City Council Monday night that they were “putting the cart before the horse.”

    The cart is a move to annex property north of I-71 into the city limits, and the horse is completion of a utility bore under the interstate that would pave the way for sewer access to businesses that could be annexed.

    Mike Frazier, one of several property owners, indicated that putting the cart before the horse could affect how the owners vote.