Local News

  • Chelsey’s Chicks

    Staff writer/photographer

    For Chelsey and Jared Schlosnagle, finding eggs isn’t just an Easter event.

    The 17-year old entrepreneur from Cropper and her 16-year old brother knew from a very young age that there might be more than just fun to finding eggs.

    With their parents’ sponsorship and guidance, Chelsey’s Gourmet Pasture Eggs produces free-range eggs that are sold to retailers such as Whole Foods and Valu Market as well as restaurants and bakeries.

  • Cabers and hammers and pipes, oh my!

    Staff writer/photographer

    Scottish Highland clans will descend upon Eminence this weekend as Kentucky Renaissance Faire plays host to the Central Kentucky Highland Games.

    It marks the first time Kentucky Renaissance will host the games.

    Director Ed Frederick said he hopes it’s the start of a tradition for the community. “This is one of the things we initially intended,” he said, “to host these kinds of events.”

  • Deputy jailer arrested in abuse case

    General Manager

    Two New Castle men, including a Henry County Deputy Jailer, have been arrested and face charges stemming from separate sexual abuse incidents.

    Anthony L. McAlister, 47, has been charged by the Kentucky State Police with two counts of first degree sodomy of a victim under 12 years of age, two counts of second degree sodomy, four counts of third degree sodomy and one count of first degree sexual abuse of a victim under the age of 12.

  • EPD comes under fire for shooting

    Staff writer/photographer

    What began as a routine call about a loose dog has turned into anything but that.

    On Sunday, Sept. 13, Charles Luster, an Eminence resident on Jackson Road, called 911 to report being attacked by a dog.

    Eminence Police Chief Carey Duncan was dispatched at 9:52 a.m. Within minutes, he shot a black Rottweiler named Dozer.

    In an official statement to EPD, Luster said he was walking southbound from his home at 4600 Jackson Road at about 9:50 a.m. He was on his way to church.

  • Madison-Milton Bridge report shows no change

    Landmark News Service

    Results are in, and the August in-depth inspection of the Milton-Madison Bridge shows no change in the superstructure’s condition.

    Inspectors gave the superstructure an overall rating of 4, or poor, on a rating scale of 0-9, with 9 being excellent.

    The bridge received the same rating during the biennial Fracture Critical inspection conducted in December 2008.

  • KHS, HCSO remove horses

    Staff writer/photographer

    Six neglected horses were removed Monday, Sept. 21, from a property at 6129 Bethlehem Road.

    The property is owned by Joan Poole, reportedly of Louisville.

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals reported the case to the Henry County Sheriff’s office and the Humane Society after receiving an anonymous tip.

    A source familiar with the situation contacted the Local, and said they contacted PETA and other agencies, as well as the Local, but wanted to remain anonymous.

  • The Nitty Gritty of dog obedience

    Staff writer/photographer

    An open mind is a key item on Debbie Gish’s checklist for her four-week basic Nitty Gritty Dog Obedience course.

    Gish, who said her methodology differs from what some dog owners have come to expect, has worked professionally with dogs since 1972.

    “If you train a dog to shake hands,” Gish said, “then you’re going to have the dog’s paw in your lap all the time.”

  • Telling Kentucky's Story

    Staff writer/photographer

    They sat quietly while an 18th century Cherokee chief told them his story.

    Eastern Elementary students sat “Indian style” on the auditorium floor last Thursday to learn the story of Atta kul kulla, the peace chief of the Cherokee nation in the 18th century United States.

    The assembly was sponsored by the Kentucky Humanities Council’s program, Telling Kentucky’s Story, and presented as a Chautaqua, a historical recreation.

  • Public Record for the week of September 30, 2009


    Amanda Nicole Johnson, 17, New Castle, to Brandon Quinn Preston, 20, New Castle.

    Crystol Lea Grigsby, 33, Eminence, to Christopher Burton Tucker, 33, Shelbyville.


    Terry Glenn Broughton, 46, Pleasureville, and Edith Aimee, 36, Pleasureville.

    Eric Allen Bratcher, 31, Shelbyville, and Stephanie Gail Clark, 27, Eminence.

    Jeffery Thomas Winters, 30, Campbellsburg, and Diana Louise Winters, 30, Campbellsburg.

  • Federal funds fill the gap

    Staff writer/photographer

    Were it not for a projected influx of almost $800,000 in federal money to the Commonwealth, the Henry County Public School system might have had some difficult choices to make.

    In presenting the 2009/2010 working budget to the HCPS Board of Education Monday, Superintendent Tim Abrams said the district’s general fund revenue is projected to fall by $451,069. That decline is due to a loss in local and state revenue.