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Local News

  • Got 'cache?

    Landmark News Service

    Visitors to the Henry County Local won't likely notice, but velcroed somewhere around the office grounds is a small weatherproof container that holds a logbook and a special message. It's exact location is concealed from "mugglers" who might attempt to vandalize or steal the device.

    It's part of a worldwide treasure-hunting game, where participants use Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to hide-and-seek what's known as 'geocache.'

  • Kentucky's agricultural district program

    Land is a valuable resource and an asset required for any kind of development, whether it is urban or rural. Yet a careful balance must be encouraged whereby our most productive lands are available for agricultural use.

    Kentucky's General Assembly, in 1928 passed the Agricultural District Law (Statute 262.850) which permits a landowner or group of landowners with 250 acres or more to petition the local conservation district to include their land in an agricultural district. The petition is then forwarded to the Kentucky Soil and Water Commission for approval or denial.

  • News briefs for April 9, 2008

    Eminence Elementary STLP holding car wash

    The Eminence Elementary Student Technology Leadership Program team will hold a car wash and bake sale Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Browning's Service Department in Eminence. Proceeds will help the team travel to its first state competition in May.

    Clements Bottom Homecoming

    The renovation of the old Clements Bottom School House has been completed and a homecoming is planned for May 10. This will be an old fashioned soup and pie supper which will begin at 11 a.m.

  • Pool committee may be dissolved

    Landmark News Service

    Craig Meadows remembers when his T-ball team celebrated its season-end with a splash at the public pool. It used to be a place where kids from the city could mingle with those from the county, and childhood laughter was the by-product of a back-buster or belly-flop.

    Now the Eminence senior hopes a weekend concert can lull a community divided over a contentious plan to re-open the city pool, closed by officials a few years ago because of sagging attendance.

  • Tractors will "drive" out cancer

    Staff Report

    Think your tractor's sexy?

    Then show it off Saturday at the inaugural 22-mile tractor ride, to benefit the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life. The event will start at the county fairgrounds and snake through Franklinton, Bethlehem and Pleasureville, before returning to the starting site.

    "We're trying to stay out of the major traffic," organizer William "Junie" Potts said. "I don't think we're going to stall traffic very much."

    A shiny New International will lead the pack, but anyone with a tractor is welcome to join the informal parade.

  • 21 years after her death, Judy Lea still helping children in Henry County

    This year will mark the 21st anniversary of the death of a beloved Henry County resident, Judy Wilson Lea. Even though many people did not know her, many still benefit from her. Lea worked for the Henry County Public School system as a cafeteria worker at Campbellsburg Elementary School. While there she became known for her willingness to help children in need. In 1987, the year she died, a fund was set up in her name that helps children every year who cannot afford the basic needs in life, such as shoes, clothing, eyeglasses and medical care.

  • New pest control company aims to "do it right"

    General Manager

    If you have a nasty bug crawling in your house, who you gonna call?

    You could call the newest bug buster in town, Star Pest Control in Pleasureville.

    The Pleasureville office, operated by David Frakes, is a branch of Star Pest Control of Shelbyville.

    "Basically, I've opened up a franchise under his company, hopefully to supply pest control services to Henry County," Frakes said.

    Though Frakes looked at several locations in Henry County, he opted for Pleasureville because of the community.

  • Kicking the habit

    A student stole her last puff from a cigarette in the campus parking lot before heading into Henry County High School last week. She tossed the butt out the window of her car, doused herself with body spray and scrambled to beat the morning bell.

    Today is National Kick Butts Day, a day when students are supposed to stand out, speak up and seize control in the fight against tobacco.

  • Serving up community

    Landmark News Service

    As dancers tried to "stomp" out juvenile diabetes in the Eminence High School gymnasium Saturday, organizer Sydney Armstrong lost sight that the event was also fulfilling a graduation requirement.

    A crowd clapped in rhythm as step dancers from Kentucky State University entertained throughout the afternoon. Armstrong, an Eminence senior, joined 31 of his classmates and all seniors from Henry County by completing a required community service project this year.

  • C'Burg to consider annexation

    General Manager

    Campbellsburg may be growing - literally.

    Though the topic has been a matter of speculation among elected officials regarding the city's population, the city's boundaries may expand.

    During the March meeting of the Campbellsburg City Council, Mayor Carl Rucker discussed the possibility of annexing land north of I-71. Initially, Rucker said he would like to go as far north as the Trimble County line, but discussion during the meeting changed that northern boundary to Kentucky 1606.

    Rucker said the council seemed accepting of the idea.