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Local News

  • Hey parents, can you spare a dime?

    Staff writer/Photographer

    Due to a sharp rise in food and fuel costs, Henry County and Eminence school districts will raise food service prices across the board for the 2008-09 school year.

    “I think it’s all driven by fuel prices,” Henry County Public Schools Superintendent Tim Abrams said. He theorized that vendors have to submit higher bids when they must drive the extra miles to locales outside metro Louisville. “Transportation costs have really hurt us.”

  • Lace up your shoes, it's Relay time

    News Intern

    The Henry County High School football field and track will come alive this Friday, June 27, as Henry County will host the 14th annual Relay for Life celebration.

    “If the weather is good, we’ll have at least 2,000 people there,” Earl Holmes, Jr., committee chairman, said.

    Henry County Relay for Life raised over $120,000 last year and over $125,000 in 2006. The 2008 goal is $120,000.

  • Cancer survivor thankful for Relay

    Staff Writer/Photographer

    “It seems like everyone in Henry County has been touched in some way,” Brenda Raake said quietly.

    A long-time participant in the American Cancer Society (ACS) Relay for Life, Raake found herself in need of the group’s support after being diagnosed with breast cancer in June 2005.

  • Possible tower location debated

    General Manager

    After several months and turnover in personnel representing Verizon Wireless, the Henry County Fiscal Court again is considering county property for placement of a cell phone tower.

    Initially, the site proposed for the location of the tower was 50 feet away from youth athletic fields.

    The new site, according to Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent, is 150 feet away from the fields.

  • New KSP Post 5 captain brings 22 years of experience

    News Intern

    When he was young, Dean Hayes had two goals.

    “The first goal was to be a major league baseball player and the second goal was to be a state trooper,” Hayes said.

    After 22 years with the Kentucky State Police, Hayes was named the new commander at KSP Post 5 in Campbellsburg.

  • Crusade for Children money returns to county

    Staff Writer/Photographer

    Now that the money’s been raised and counted through the WHAS-11 Crusade for Children, organizations hoping to receive grants through the program must decide just what to put on their wish lists.

    This year, area fire departments raised more than $75,000 for the charitable cause.

  • Council resumes annexation discussion

    General Manager

    Nearly a month after tabling discussion on annexation, the Campbellsburg City Council again will consider expanding the city’s boundaries.

    During the council’s meeting Monday night, Mayor Carl Rucker indicated that events at Kentucky Motor Speedway could mean big things for the city.

  • Close to Home: Lake may be the county's best kept secret

    By Erin Melwing

    News Intern

    Just a few minutes from I-71 and a short drive from anywhere in the county, Lake Jericho is one of Henry County’s best kept secrets, according to Larry Ramsey, general manager of Lake Jericho.

    “Of course I might be a little biased, but this place is beautiful,” Ramsey said. “The whole family can spend the day together grilling out, having a picnic or maybe even catching some fish.”

  • No one injured in Eminence house fire

    General Manager

    What should have been a fun, relaxing family vacation in Florida changed Monday morning when an Eminence family received word their home was on fire.

    The morning began with severe weather that included heavy rain and pea-sized hail in some parts of Henry County, but that storm also included heavy lightning.

    According to neighbors, and some city and fire officials, some of that lightning may have been responsible for igniting the fire at 120 Oak Drive, the home of Obie and Beth Newton.

  • The Bench

    News Intern

    “Behave!” Fleicia Smith yelled while laughing as she walked back to work. Her orders were aimed at the two grinning men on the park bench in front of the courthouse in New Castle.

    “We behave, we have to. When you’re this old, you’re not allowed to have fun anymore,” Pete Raymer said.